Anthropology

Classes

ATH 101 : Introduction to Biological Anthropology

Introduces biological anthropology and the study of evolution in the context of modern genetics and primate behavior studies. Examines human fossil record, diversity, and commonality of present and past populations of humankind.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon completion of the course students will be able to:

  • Discuss basic concepts and methods in biological anthropology.
  • Use an understanding of biology, genetics, and fossil evidence to examine the process of human biological and cultural evolution over time.
  • Identify how human beings influence the environment and are influenced by the environment in which they live. 
  • Use an understanding of anthropology to describe historical and contemporary issues in evolutionary biology and genetics, such as race, stem cell research, gene patents, eugenics, and ethical issues related to the excavation and study of the prehistoric remains of indigenous people.

ATH 102 : Introduction to Archaeology and Prehistory

Introduces methods and techniques used by archaeologists to study the development of human culture. Provides a survey of world prehistory, while emphasizing the development of social complexity and the origins of agriculture that precede both new and old world civilizations.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

  • Use an understanding of archaeological methods and theories to evaluate artifacts and other data.
  • Describe the impact of human beings on the environment over time and in different ecological settings.
  • Discuss ethical issues related to cultural resource management and the excavation and study of human remains associated with indigenous societies from an anthropological perspective.
  • Examine systems of power and social justice related to ancient societies and compare them with similar systems of power and privilege in contemporary societies from an anthropological perspective.

ATH 103 : Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

Considers contemporary human cultures from an anthropological perspective. Covers fieldwork, language, race, gender, sex and marriage, kinship, politics, world view, religion, economics, and globalization from a cross-cultural perspective.

This course compares cultures found around the globe, focusing closely upon at least two specific cultures, with extended discussion of additional cultures and societies as appropriate.  Greater understanding of particular cultures will be achieved through an application of the comparative method. 

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

  • Describe basic concepts, methods, and theories associated with cultural anthropology.
  • Use an understanding of anthropology to identify and compare values, beliefs, norms, economic systems, and social organization or institutions in a variety of societies in different world regions.
  • Examine systems of power and social justice issues related to U.S. society and other cultures from an anthropological perspective.
  • Explore fieldwork methods and ethical considerations of doing anthropological fieldwork.