English

Classes

ENG 104 : Introduction to Literature (Fiction)

Examines significant works of fiction, short stories and novels, from diverse cultures and periods in history; explores fiction as an art form designed to provoke thought and challenge social norms; considers fiction as an expression of human experience.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should able to:

  • Recognize and understand the variety of stylistic choices that authors of fiction make within given forms and how form influences meaning.
  • Articulate ways in which the text contributes to self-understanding.
  • Engage, through the text, unfamiliar and diverse cultures, experiences and points of view, recognizing the text as a product of a particular culture and historical moment.
  • Understand the text within the context of a literary tradition or convention.
  • Evaluate various interpretations of a text and their validity through reading, writing, and discussion in individual and group responses analyzing the support/evidence for a particular interpretation.
  • Conduct research to find materials appropriate to use for literary analysis, using MLA conventions to document primary and secondary sources in written responses to a literary text

ENG 105 : Introduction to Literature (Plays)

Examines plays as literature and as an art form designed to provoke thought and to challenge social norms. Considers drama as an expression of human experience.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

  • Engage, through dramatic works, unfamiliar and diverse cultures, experiences, and points of view.
  • Articulate ways in which the works of drama contribute to self-understanding.
  • Recognize the text as a product of a particular culture and historical moment and its relationship to different art forms.
  • Recognize the role of form and how it influences meaning by identifying the variety of stylistic choices that authors make within given forms.
  • Evaluate various interpretations of plays and their validity through reading, writing and speaking, and through individual and group responses, and analyze the support/evidence for a particular interpretation.
  • Conduct research to find materials appropriate to use for literary analysis, using MLA conventions to document primary and secondary sources in written response to a literary text.

ENG 106 : Introduction to Literature (Poetry)

Examines significant poems from diverse cultures and periods in history; explores poetry as an art form designed to provoke thought and challenge social norms; considers poetry as an expression of human experience.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Engage, through poetic texts, diverse points of view and diverse historical, cultural, and literary contexts.
  • Analyze a variety of poetic forms, from sonnets to haiku to free verse, and identify and effectively employ poetic terms, including diction, sound, rhyme, rhythm, meter, imagery, symbolism, persona, etc.
  • Explicate poems in writing and speech and provide adequate support/evidence for such explications.
  • Recognize the multiple possibilities of interpretations of poems and the validity thereof.
  • Articulate ways in which the text contributes to self-understanding.
  • Conduct research to find materials to use for literary analysis, using MLA conventions to document primary and secondary sources in written response to a literary text.

ENG 107 : Introduction to World Literature (Up to 16th-Century)

Introduces a broad spectrum of literature in translation that begins in antiquity and concludes at the dawn of the Renaissance. Includes works of fiction, poetry, drama and non-fiction. Examines the uniqueness and interconnectedness of literature from a variety of worldwide traditions, both western and non-western.

Instructors may choose an anthology, individual works, or both.  This course meets the requirements of a survey, emphasizing breadth over depth.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

  • Identify and discuss the ways in which literary texts from different cultures and time periods up to the 16th-century are interconnected.
  • Analyze the effects of war, religion, technology, economic development, racism, and culture on world literature from antiquity up to the 16th-century.
  • Compare and discuss important similarities and differences between the various literary forms, periods, and histories in both western and nonwestern literatures up to the 16th-century.
  • Write clear, focused, coherent essays about literature for an academic audience, using standard English conventions of grammar and style.

ENG 108 : Introduction to World Literature (16th-Century to Present)

Introduces a broad spectrum of literature in translation that begins in the Renaissance and concludes at the present. Includes works of fiction, poetry, drama and non-fiction. Examines the uniqueness and interconnectedness of literature from a variety of worldwide traditions, both western and non-western.

Instructors may choose an anthology, individual works, or both.  This course meets the requirements of a survey, emphasizing breadth over depth.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

  • Discuss crucial literary movements that transpired from the 16th-century to the present, including the Renaissance, Romanticism, Modernism, and Post-Modernism.
  • Analyze the effects of war, religion, colonialism, technology, totalitarianism, economic development, racism, and culture on world literature from the 16th-century to the present. 
  • Compare and discuss important similarities and differences between the various literary forms, periods, and histories in both western and nonwestern literatures from the 16th-century to the present.
  • Write clear, focused, coherent essays about literature for an academic audience, using standard English conventions of grammar and style.

ENG 195 : Film Studies: Film as Art

Enhances understanding of film through analysis of film history and form. Develops visual literacy and analysis skills by offering a range of tools to study any film. Analyze ways in which a film may both contribute and react to its time and culture; analyze film through studying the techniques by which it was made; and substantiate observations with examples taken from film tradition and from the film itself.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Use understanding of film technique and film as an art medium as tools to analyze film.
  • Articulate a position, orally and in writing, by situating a film in a cultural context, and substantiating observations with examples taken from that tradition and from the film itself.
  • Use reflective visual reading, writing listening and speaking skills to recognize, develop and articulate personal standards, predispositions and theories regarding film and critical responses to film.

ENG 196 : Film Studies: Directors

Enhances understanding of film through analysis of directorial decisions and film techniques. Develops visual literacy and analysis skills by offering a range of tools to study any film. Analyze ways in which directorial decisions may affect an individual film and viewer; situate a film within a director's body of work; analyze ways in which it may both contribute and react to its time and culture; and substantiate observations with examples taken from the film tradition and from the film itself.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Use understanding of film technique and film as an art medium as tools to analyze film.
  • Articulate a position, orally and in writing, by situating a film in a cultural context, and substantiating observations with examples taken from that tradition and from the film itself.
  • Use reflective visual reading, writing listening and speaking skills to recognize, develop and articulate personal standards, predispositions and theories regarding film and critical responses to film.
  • Recognize ways in which directorial decisions may affect an individual film, as well as affect a viewer.

ENG 197 : Film Studies: Contemporary Themes and Genres

Enhances understanding of film through analysis of contemporary film-making, narrative techniques, genres, themes and critical approaches. Develops visual literacy and analysis skills by offering a range of tools to study any film. Analyze contemporary film techniques and the ways in which the films may both contribute and react to their time and culture; study contemporary film theory; and substantiate observations with examples taken from the film tradition and from the film itself.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Use understanding of film technique and film as an art medium as tools to analyze film.
  • Articulate a position, orally and in writing, by situating a film in a cultural context, and substantiating observations with examples taken from that tradition and from the film itself.
  • Use reflective visual reading, writing listening and speaking skills to recognize, develop and articulate personal standards, predispositions and theories regarding film and critical responses to film.
  • Recognize individual films as representative of the contemporary culture and historical moment that produced them.

ENG 201 : Shakespeare: Early Works

Explores the development of Shakespeare's art and contribution to literature, culture, and the English language, with a focus on the earlier histories, tragedies, comedies, and non-dramatic poetry. Introduces the study of Shakespeare's dramatic techniques, character development, historical and cultural setting, and language.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Identify and discuss qualities of Shakespeare’s earlier texts and the issues of interpretation and language confronted by readers, actors, and
  • viewers when approaching his writing.
  • Discuss the development of Shakespeare’s art and contribution to literature and culture.
  • Read analytically to determine Shakespeare’s purpose, historical and cultural perspective, and use of rhetorical and dramatic strategies in creating
  • a play/poem.
  • Discuss how the philosophical and intellectual viewpoints of the English Renaissance shaped Shakespeare’s writing, and their application today.
  • Engage in thoughtful discussion and self-reflection regarding the social and ethical questions the plays and poems raise regarding human experience.
  • Write coherent and compelling essays that begin to explore the complex questions Shakespeare raises.

ENG 202 : Shakespeare: Later Works

Explores the development of Shakespeare's art and contribution to literature, culture, and the English language, with a focus on the later histories, tragedies, comedies, and non-dramatic poetry. Introduces the study of Shakespeare's dramatic techniques, character development, historical and cultural setting, and language.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Identify and discuss qualities of Shakespeare’s later texts and the issues of interpretation and language confronted by readers, actors, and viewers when approaching his writing.
  • Discuss the development of Shakespeare’s art and contribution to literature and culture.
  • Read analytically to determine Shakespeare’s purpose, historical and cultural perspective, and use of rhetorical and dramatic strategies in creating a play/poem.
  • Discuss how the philosophical and intellectual viewpoints of the English Renaissance shaped Shakespeare’s writing, and their application today.
  • Engage in thoughtful discussion and self?reflection regarding the social and ethical questions the plays and poems raise regarding human experience.
  • Write coherent and compelling essays that begin to explore the complex questions Shakespeare raises.

ENG 204 : Survey of English Literature

The first half of a two-course survey of British literature that includes English 205. English 204 introduces students to British literature from its Anglo-Saxon and Celtic beginnings through the 18th century.

Instructors may choose an anthology, complete works, or a combination of both. The course will meet the requirements of a survey, emphasizing breadth over depth.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

The students will:

  • Explore basic critical approaches to texts of English literature for the time period of 1000 CE through 1784.
  • Identify relationships between form and meaning in English literature in the time period of 1000 CE through 1784.
  • Make connections among texts and historical, political, and cultural contexts.
  • Recognize literary conventions and build a critical vocabulary with which to discuss and write bout literature.
  • Write clear, focused, coherent essays about literature for an academic audience using standard English conventions and grammar and style.

ENG 205 : Survey of English Literature

The second half of a two-course survey of British literature that includes English 204. English 205 introduces students to British literature from the 19th century to the present.

Instructors may choose an anthology, complete works, or a combination of both. The course will meet the requirements of a survey, emphasizing breadth over depth.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

The students will:

  • Explore basic critical approaches to texts of English literature for the time period of 1785 to the present.
  • Identify relationships between form and meaning in English literature in the time period of 1785 to the present.
  • Make connections among texts and historical, political, and cultural contexts.
  • Recognize literary conventions and build a critical vocabulary with which to discuss and write about literature.
  • Write clear, focused, coherent essays about literature for an academic audience using standard English conventions of grammar and style.

ENG 207 : World Literature - Asian (India)

Introduces students to Indian literature in English (for the most part, translated) from ancient to contemporary. May include such works and authors as hymns from the Rig Veda, The Ramayana, classical poetry, and the twentieth century authors Narayan, Ved Mehta and Arundhati Roy.

Instructors may choose an anthology, individual works, or a combination of both. The course will meet the requirements of a survey, emphasizing breadth over depth, as well as a mixture of classical and contemporary texts.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon completion of English 207 with a “C” or higher, students will be able to:

  •  Identify and discuss the ways Indian texts speak about and are influenced by history, language, caste, economics, religion, gender, regional differences, sexuality and culture.
  • Analyze literary texts and recognize the limitations of such analysis, especially due to the challenges reading non-western texts in a predominantly western academic setting.
  • Discuss multiple approaches to Indian texts, including those that illuminate how South Asians debate and understand their own literary and cinematic traditions.
  • Apply the challenges and wisdom gained in reading South Asian texts to other intercultural encounters in academics, business, politics, and community.
  • Write clear, focused, coherent essays about literature for an academic audience, using standard English conventions of grammar and style.

ENG 208 : World Literature - Asian (China)

Introduces Chinese literature translated into English, from the oldest texts (ca. 1000 BCE) to contemporary works. Includes poetry, fiction, nonfiction, drama, and film. Examines the cultural and historical importance of Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism on Chinese literature.

Instructors may choose an anthology, individual works, or a combination of both. The course will meet the requirements of a survey, emphasizing breadth over depth, as well as a mixture of classical and contemporary texts.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon completion of the course, students should be able to:

  • Recognize differences between Chinese and Western concepts of literature and explain how these differences affect what we read and how we read it.
  • Speak to the limits of translation, especially in regard to core Chinese concepts that have no equivalent concept in English.
  • Distinguish the traditional literature of the bureaucratic class from traditional folk literature and recognize the cross influences of the two traditions.
  • Read works of Chinese literature with an understanding of the cultural and historical importance of Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism.
  • Write clear, focused, coherent essays about Chinese literature for an academic audience, using standard English conventions of grammar and style.

ENG 209 : World Literature - Asian (Japan)

Introduces a range of Japanese texts and films in order to explore the artistic, social, political, and historical characteristics of Japanese literature from the earliest poems to contemporary novels. Explores movements in literary and artistic traditions from multiple periods (e.g., Heian, Meiji) and analyzes how texts emphasize or resist the values of each historical moment. Considers issues of social class, religion, and aesthetics as they apply to creative works.

Instructors may choose an anthology, individual works, or a combination of both. The course will meet the requirements of a survey, emphasizing breadth over depth, as well as a mixture of classical and contemporary texts.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon completion of the course, students should be able to:

  • Read Japanese literature and discuss the aesthetics of its periods (e.g. Heian,Muromachi, Edo, etc).
  • Speak to the limitations of translation into English, particularly the fundamental challenge of language embedded value systems.
  • Read Japanese literature with a knowledge of important religious concepts and historical events (e.g.. Shintoism, Buddhism, the policy of isolationism, the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, westernization,etc).
  • Write literary analysis that demonstrates an awareness of the different style of thought available in the literature of Japan.
  • Identify works of literature from classical Japanese writers and trace the continuation of their legacy in contemporary texts.

ENG 212 : Biography and Autobiography

Covers the study of biographies, autobiographies, memoirs, and journals as works of literature.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon completion of the course, students should be able to:

  • Recognize the structures of biography and autobiography as distinct forms of literature.
  • Compare and contrast the ways in which a perceiving, living individual (the "subject") is treated in biography, autobiography, and other literary genres such as poetry, fiction, and journalism.
  • Recognize how an author's own ideology shapes reality in an autobiography or biography, including how it raises questions about truth, factuality, objectivity, and subjectivity.
  • When reading, connect biographical and autobiographical texts to their historical and cultural contexts.
  • Recognize the roles that argument, rhetoric, fiction, photography, aesthetics, and evidence play in the composing process of biography and autobiography.

ENG 213 : Latin American Literature

Explores fiction, creative non-fiction, poetry, drama, myth, and other texts from Latin America. Includes works from many cultures and ethnicities from Latin America, including indigenous peoples. All readings are in English.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

By the end of the course, students should be able to:

  • Read and discuss the literary forms and elements in a variety of texts (“texts” here is meant in its broadest sense and may include music, architecture, weaving, and visual arts).
  • Compare and contrast the social, religious, political, economic, gender, generational, and environmental issues raised in these texts with those seen in the world at hand.
  • Discuss how literary themes and metaphors express particular world views.
  • Explore Otherness by studying the issues of identity and alienation present in the texts, describing the layers of identity portrayed through characters and cultures and paying particular attention to the creation and dissolution of various types of borders.
  • Discuss the writers’ explorations of the role of the storyteller in various Latin American and indigenous societies.
  • Write clear, focused, coherent essays about literature for an academic audience, using standard English conventions of grammar and style.

ENG 214 : Literature of the Northwest

Studies fictional, factual, and poetic works by Northwest writers from before the arrival of Euro-Americans to the present. Emphasizes relationship between Northwest writing and Northwest social, cultural, and physical environment.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon completion of the course, students should be able to:

  • Define "Northwest literature" in relation to the physical environments and cultures, both tribal and Euro-American, which have produced it and which are often its central subjects.
  • Trace the social and environmental histories of the Northwest through its literature.
  • Connect the literature of the Northwest to other arts practiced in the Northwest and to other literature produced in the rest of the United States at comparable periods.
  • Write clear, focused, coherent essays about literature for an academic audience, using standard English conventions of grammar and style.

ENG 216 : Teen and Children's Literature

Explores a wide range of literature written for children and teens and introduces the history of this literature focusing on American and British writing as well as international and multicultural traditions. Examines the differences between literature for children and teens and literature for adults, the relationship between text and illustrations, and other issues and controversies concerning children's literature such as the didactic use of text and censorship.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

  • Use literary analysis to analyze and critique children’s and teen’s literature, reading familiar works with a fresh perspective and utilizing critiques and perspectives when communicating with others.
  • Recognize and understand the ways in which literature for teens and children is generally created in a cultural and historic context that has influenced trends and uses of this literature in the past.
  • Apply cultural and historic context to current uses and trends in order to further understand the influences these factors have on current publishing practices in these genres today.
  • Write clearly about ideas and issues related to literature written for teens and children, identifying the variety of genres and historic trends as well as controversies surrounding these genres such as didactic applications and censorship.

ENG 222 : Images of Women in Literature

Explores images of women as they appear in a diverse range of texts from across a variety of cultures and historical periods. Focuses on how both men and women have imagined and represented femininity and femaleness in ways that can challenge, reinforce and/or reconfigure culturally-based perceptions, behaviors and practices.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students will be able to:

  • Appreciate the ways in which the text constructs images of women within diverse cultures and a variety of historical moments.
  • Locate (find and place) representations of women within various literary traditions, conventions, and in relation to other forms of artistic expression.
  • Recognize stylistic choices authors make within given forms and the ways they affect the creation of images of women in literature.
  • Explore how form influences meaning in complex documents that invite multiple interpretation.
  • Write clear, focused, coherent essays about literature for an academic audience using standard English conventions and style.

ENG 230 : Environmental Literature

Introduces texts that explore the relationship between people and their environments, both natural and built. Examines historical trends that have shaped thinking, understanding, and feelings about how humans and the natural world interact. Explores literary writings on issues of sustainability, environmental justice, ecological literacy, and a sense of place.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

  • Identify, define, and evaluate kinds of environmental literature.
  • Identify and explain the strategies which poets, novelists, essayists and other writers have used to address environmental questions.
  • Use the methods of literary analysis and literary history to identify changing trends in environmental tropes and concerns.
  • Apply an understanding of environmental literature to explain the interconnected environmental effects of everyday decisions we make as individuals and a culture.
  • Critically examine the complex and interconnected relationship between human behavior and  the environment through a lens of sustainability and the “triple bottom line” of people, planet, and profit.

ENG 237 : Working-Class Literature

Introduces U.S. and global literature by and/or about the working class.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

  • Analyze literature to identify the differences and similarities in working-class experiences across time and national contexts.
  • Identify recurring themes within working-class literature both within and across national contexts.
  • Identify differences in style and form in working class literature that are shaped by national status, traditions, and/or cultures.
  • Identify the variety of contexts—historical, cultural, sociological, and political—under which literature is produced and distributed.
  • Produce critical, reflective, and/or creative writing about working-class literature.

ENG 240 : Introduction to Native American Literatures

Studies literary arts and cultural expressions by Native American authors. Considers Native American literatures in their national, historical, cultural, geographical, political, and legal contexts. Prioritizes Indigenous experience, worldview, and intellectual traditions in the study of Native literatures.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon completion of the course, students should be able to:

  • Recognize the diversity and vitality of Native American experiences and expressions.
  • Identify how a variety of Native literatures are influenced by the historical tensions between the United States and the Native peoples of this continent.
  • Trace the incorporation of traditional Native stories or characters into the narrative production of contemporary writers.
  • Recognize the influence of Indigenous languages, cultures, worldviews, legal histories, and intellectual traditions upon the literary productions of Native writers.
  • Explain how various perceptions of Indigenous identity and nationhood shape Native literatures and scholarship.

ENG 244 : Introduction to Asian-American Literature

Studies writings in English by American writers of Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese, Filipino, Pacific Islander, and other Asian ancestry. Considers the writings in their historical, cultural, political, and social contexts. Emphasizes development of attitudes, values, and identities.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon completion of the course, students should be able to:

  • Recognize distinguishing characteristics of the various Asian-American literatures and relate the writings to their historical, cultural, and political contexts.
  • Recognize the tensions in the writings between assimilationist attitudes and separatist attitudes, and between individual and representative presentations of Asian-American life.
  • Explain how culturally based assumptions influence perceptions and behaviors in the writings, with particular attention to the function of stereotyped caricatures.
  • Recognize the role of gender differences in writings produced by male Asian-American writers and by women Asian-American writers.
  • Trace the incorporation of Asian folktales, stories, parables, proverbs, and other old-world literary material into Asian-American literatures.
  • Recognize the role of audience, or intended readership, in the presentation of Asian-American life, and the assumptions about cultural differences the writers are making.

ENG 250 : Introduction to Folklore and Mythology

Develops a cross-cultural perspective on myths, mythologies and folklore from around the world. Explores different theories of the cultural meanings and functions of myth, past and present. Introduces various ways of interpreting and experiencing myth and folklore as texts with oral origins.

Instructors may choose an anthology with excerpts, complete works, or a combination of both. The assigned readings will cover a range and diversity of mythology and folklore.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon completion of ENG 250 with a “C” or higher, students should be able to:

  • Recognize the essentially oral nature of myths and folklore and examine how the context of oral performance shapes the meaning of a story
  • Discuss how a diverse range of specific myths function within the cultures that produce them
  • Explore a variety of scholarly approaches to mythology and folklore
  • Recognize recurring mythological themes and motifs in traditional myths and the arts
  • Explore how the collection, transcription and interpretation of myths reflect a process of cultural struggle and historical patterns of domination and
  • Write clear,focused, coherent essays about literature for an academic audience, using standard English conventions of grammar and style.

ENG 253 : American Literature to 1865

Introduces the literature of the land which is now the United States from before European contact through the mid-nineteenth century. Revolves around written manifestations of the various interests, preoccupations, and experiences of the peoples creating and recreating American culture. Considers various literary forms, canonized (such as novel, narrative poem), popular (such as the serialized tale, verse) and unpublished (the jeremiad, Native American oratory, the slave narrative, diary).

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful students should be able to:

  • Identify and discuss strengths, limitations, and cultural assumptions of various literary forms practiced in America through the mid-nineteenth century.
  • Identify and discuss the roles which gender, race, age, class, ethnicity, wealth, poverty, and geography have played in creating American literature.
  • Identify and discuss the issues, conflicts, preoccupations, and themes of the various literatures of America.
  • Use literary texts to examine the historical, cultural, and rhetorical contexts in which they were written
  • Identify and discuss aesthetic aspects of American literature, canonized (such as plot, characterization, and stanza forms), popular (parable structure, call and response, floral and architectural coding systems), and unpublished (mnemonics or oral literature, characteristics of military and women’s journals and letters).
  • Write clear, focused, coherent essays about literature for an academic audience, using standard English conventions of grammar and style.

 

ENG 254 : American Literature from 1865

Introduces students to the literature of the land which is now the United States from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. The course revolves around written manifestations of the various interests, preoccupations, and experiences of the peoples creating and recreating American culture.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Identify and discuss strengths, limitations, and cultural assumptions of various literary forms practiced in America through the mid-nineteenth century.
  • Identify and discuss the roles which gender, race, age, class, ethnicity, wealth, poverty, and geography have played in creating American literature.
  • Identify and discuss the issues, conflicts, preoccupations, and themes of the various literatures of America.
  • Use literary texts to examine the historical, cultural, and rhetorical contexts in which they were written
  • Identify and discuss aesthetic aspects of American literature, canonized (such as plot, characterization, and stanza forms), popular (parable structure, call and response, floral and architectural coding systems), and unpublished (mnemonics or oral literature, characteristics of military and women’s journals and letters).
  • Write clear, focused, coherent essays about literature for an academic audience, using standard English conventions of grammar and style.

ENG 257 : African-American Literature

Covers the major genres and authors of African-American literature from the period of slavery through the Harlem Renaissance.

Major topics include abolition, labor and conditions under slave bondage, reconstructing the black identity in the post-Emancipation Era and the Harlem Renaissance, protest against racist violence, racial passing and socioeconomic mobility, creation of a Black aesthetic.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

  • Recognize the importance of self-documentation as a means to claim the African-American identity.
  • Examine the intersection of economics, history, culture, region, politics, religion, gender, and sexuality to African-American literature.
  • Understand the legacy of the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade to the African-American experience.
  • Identify the relationship between African-American literary forms and Black vernacular (gospel, blues, jazz, sermons, stories, and the oral tradition).

ENG 258 : African-American Literature

Introduces the literature of Americans whose roots are in Africa. Emphasizes the way contemporary political and social aspirations of African Americans are reflected in the literature of the periods from the Harlem Renaissance through the present.

Surveys the creative literature of black writers in the United States with special attention given to the social and symbolic environments from which they emerged, protest against racist violence, socioeconomic mobility, and creation of a modern day Black aesthetic.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Students should be able to:

  • Analyze AfricanAmerican literature from the Harlem Renaissance to the present to identify themes about race, ethnicity, and culture and recognize the contribution of AfricanAmerican writers to recreate cultural identity.
  • Examine the intersection of economics, history, culture, politics, religion, and gender to AfricanAmerican literature.
  • Perform textual analysis by using literary terminology and theory to examine relationships between literary forms and themes.
  • Identify the relationship between AfricanAmerican literary forms and Black vernacular (gospel, blues, jazz, sermons, stories, and the oral tradition).
  • Write coherent academic essays that explore the complexity of the literature.

ENG 260 : Introduction to Women Writers

Explores women's writings and literary theory from diverse places and historical periods.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students will be able to:

  • Appreciate the role of gender in shaping texts as a product of particular cultures and historical moments, especially unfamiliar ones.
  • Consider women’s writing as a significant influence in the construction of individual and cultural experiences within specific historical contexts
  • Observe elements of form, grammar, dialect, and various language devices as a means by which texts create meaning
  • Challenge cultural norms and limits of analysis/criticism to create a richer experience of the texts, including multiple interpretations of the text as a complex fabric.

ENG 261 : Literature of Science Fiction

Explores the roots of science fiction as well as classic and modern works of science fiction and speculative literature. Introduces common themes in science fiction, the various ideological underpinnings of science fiction, and the way such literature comments on current issues in society and presents new ideas to society.

Course texts may include anthologies, collections, novels, magazines, or other works the instructor deems appropriate. Instructors may also include additional works from related or sub genres, such as fantasy, magical realism or cyber-punk, cinematic or video texts, and/or critical works about science fiction.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Recognize the elements common to science fiction that distinguish it from other genres and analyze science fiction works from various critical approaches using appropriate literary terminology.
  • Create critical hypotheses about texts and argue for their validity using textual evidence.
  • Analyze the ways in which science fiction reflects and distorts "reality" and the ideological arguments underlying its presentations.
  • Explore the tradition of science fiction and discover ways in which authors have recognized the possibilities of the genre by examining a variety of modern and classic works.
  • Examine different presentations in science fiction of gender, science and technology, governmental systems, culture, religion and ethnicity.
  • Write clear, focused coherent essays about science fiction for an academic audience using standard English conventions of grammar and style.

ENG 265 : Literature of Social Protest

Develops an understanding of how the literature of social protest addresses issues of class oppression, economic inequality, racism, sexism, war, and peace. Engages theoretical questions about the relationship between politics and aesthetic expression, as well as the nature of literature in relation to social protest.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon completion of the course students will be able to:

  • Analyze and discuss texts from a range of genres in the literature of social protest (e.g. poetry, novels, films, nonfiction, songs, and multimedia).
  • Identify persistent themes and their expressions in the literature of social protest (e.g. solidarity, systems of power, systems of social control, oppression and revolution).
  • Articulate ways that the literature of social protest is embedded in historical and cultural forces.
  • Identify relationships between historical moments of social protest and expressions of literary aesthetics.
  • Produce critical, reflective, and/or creative writing about the literature of social protest.

ENG 266 : Literature of War

Introduces a range of international texts and films pertaining to war in order to explore the social, cultural, political, and historical conditions that have led to war, the experiences of those directly and indirectly involved in war, as well as its aftermath. Explores various perspectives, including those of combatants and their families, innocent victims, returning soldiers and veterans, and later generations. Explores the many complex questions about the evolving definitions of war; the morality of war; the roles of race, gender and religion in war; the roles of propaganda and anti-war movements; the ways in which wars are remembered and forgotten; and the possibilities for peace. Covers memoirs, fiction, poetry, literary nonfiction, graphic novels, documentaries and feature films created by both combatants and civilians.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Identify and discuss qualities of war literature and film, and the unique issues confronted by writers and readers alike when approaching this literature.
  • Read/watch analytically to determine an author’s/director’s purpose, perspective and use of rhetorical strategies in creating a work of literature/film.
  • Use international literary texts and films from a variety of perspectives to understand the wide range of experiences around war, and to engage in thoughtful discussion and self-reflection in the context of this understanding.
  • Discuss the cultural and social differences that allow us to cast the "other" as an enemy in times of war and make peace-making break down.
  • Write coherent and compelling essays that continue to explore the complex questions pertaining to the Literature of War.

ENG 269 : Wilderness Literature

Explores writings about wilderness and the natural world, giving attention to the relationship between nature and culture. Considers a variety of historical perspectives through essays, poetry, book-length nonfiction, novels, and film. Examines efforts to rethink the concept of wilderness with respect to law, gender, work, race, and the built environment (e.g., urban forests, gardens, farming) while addressing contemporary concerns for global environmental sustainability.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion, student should be able to:

  • Use literary analysis to understand, critique, and discuss writings about wilderness and the natural world, recognizing important themes, concepts, and issues.
  • Recognize how literature shapes and challenges our attitudes and actions towards nature—and how our ideas about the meaning of wilderness continue to evolve.
  • Apply an understanding of wilderness literature to the vision of global environmental sustainability.
  • Write clearly about the complex ideas and questions pertaining to the literature of wilderness and the natural world.

ENG 275 : The Bible as Literature

Explores the Bible as a literary text by discussing authorship, translation, literary forms, history, and cultural context. Discusses the Bible as a point of reference for literature as well as for other works of art.

The Bible as Literature examines the way stories, characters, and idioms of the Bible become allusions and metaphors in contemporary western literature and culture. ENG 275 applies the techniques and language of literary criticism to Biblical text. The course work may include the examination of a variety of translations of the Bible and the process of canonization. The course may examine not only books from the traditional canons but also from texts not typically included in the canon such as the Apocrypha and Gnostic texts.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon completing this course, students should be able to…

  • Read the Bible with an understanding of its literary forms and conventions as well as its relationship to history and culture.
  • Apply concepts of literary criticism (e.g., typology, archetype, parallelism, chiastic structure) to a variety of writings including the Hebrew Bible, New Testament, and Apocryphal books.
  • Recognize the Bible’s lasting influence on other works of literature, art, music, and popular culture.
  • Discuss and show familiarity with selected Bible texts as well as secondary biblical scholarship.
  • Analyze a variety of English translations to understand the effects of translation from the original languages (Hebrew, Aramaic, Greek) on the meaning and interpretation of texts.
  • Write coherent and compelling essays that begin to explore the complex questions pertaining to the Bible.