Geology

Classes

G 160 : Geology: Oregon Coast

Designed to introduce the relationships between the biology and geology of the Oregon Coast.

Geology: Oregon Coast (G160) is a one-term course that explores the geologic history of the Oregon Coast and the relationships between geology and the plants and animals of the Oregon Coast. Students will go on a three-day field trip to the Oregon Coast to get hands-on experience of concepts covered in the lecture portion of the class..

Credits

2

After completion of this course, students will:

  • Apply an understanding of basic ecological principles to the plant and animal species living on the Oregon Coast to appreciate the complexity of factors that influence the "web of life" and our place within it.
  • Apply a basic knowledge of geological processes that formed this region to the impact this geology has on the biological organisms found here
  • Use scientific field research equipment
  • Communicate effectively orally and in writing
  • Successfully apply basic geological concepts in future coursework.

G 184 : Global Climate Change

Covers characteristics of Earth's climate system. Includes the atmosphere, ocean, biosphere, and solid Earth as well as past, present, and future climate change and future mitigation and adaptation efforts. Includes a weekly lab.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

After taking this course, students should be able to:

  • Use an Earth system perspective that includes the atmosphere, hydrosphere, solid earth, and biosphere to explain past, present, and future global climate patterns.
  • Identify both human and non-human forcings on the climate system and the system response to these forcings including possible feedback mechanisms.  
  • Use real data to document climate change impacts both globally and in the Pacific Northwest and link these changes to the current scientific understanding of climate change.
  • Make field, laboratory and web based observations and measurements of climate, use scientific reasoning to interpret these observations and measurements, and compare the results with current models of the climate system identifying areas of congruence and discrepancy.
  • Access climate science information from a variety of sources, evaluate the quality of this information, and critically compare this information with current models of the climate system.
  • Use scientifically valid modes of inquiry, individually and collaboratively, to critically assess the hazards and risks posed by climate change, to themselves and society, and evaluate the efficacy of ethically robust responses to these risks.
  • Communicate effectively about Earth’s changing climate, its impacts, and possible responses from an Earth System perspective.

G 200F : Geology Field Studies: Pacific Northwest Coast

Introduces basic geology concepts through lecture and a field trip in the vicinity of the Pacific Northwest Coast.

Geology Field Studies: Pacific Northwest Coast (G200 F) is a one credit course designed to engage students with the earth sciences by examining the geology of the Pacific Northwest Coast area.  The course consists of a one day field trip buttressed by supporting lectures that introduce aspects of geology as needed to explain the geology of the Pacific Northwest Coast area. This course can be used to partly fulfill graduation requirements for the Associate Degree. The text and materials have been chosen by the faculty and the emphasis of the course will be the viewpoint of the author(s). This includes the geologic time scale and the evolution of the Earth.

Credits

1

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon completing this course, students should be able to:

  • narrate a geologic history of the Pacific Northwest Coast region by combining site specific content knowledge with limited field observations and experiences within the Pacific Northwest Coast region.
  • connect current coastal hazard assessments and land use concerns of the Pacific Northwest Coast region to the geography and geologic history of the Pacific Northwest Coast region.
  • communicate geologic concepts effectively using maps and diagrams in written and/or oral formats.

G 200G : Geology Field Studies Columbia River Gorge

Introduces basic concepts in geology through lecture and a field trip in the vicinity of the Columbia River Gorge.

Geology Field Studies: Columbia River Gorge (G200 G) is a one credit course designed to engage students with the earth sciences by examining the geology of the Columbia River Gorge area.  The course consists of a one day field trip buttressed by supporting lectures that introduce aspects of geology as needed to explain the geology of the Columbia River Gorge area. This course can be used to partly fulfill graduation requirements for the Associate Degree. The text and materials have been chosen by the faculty and the emphasis of the course will be the viewpoint of the author(s). This includes the geologic time scale and the evolution of the Earth.

Credits

1

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon completing this course, students should be able to:

  • narrate a geologic history of the Columbia River Gorge region by combining site specific content knowledge with limited field observations and experiences within the Columbia River Gorge region.
  • connect current  hazard assessments and environmental concerns affecting the Columbia River Gorge region to the geography and geologic history of the Columbia River Gorge region.
  • communicate geologic concepts effectively using maps and diagrams in written and/or oral formats

G 201 : Earth Materials and Tectonics

Introduces physical geology which deals with minerals, rocks, internal structure of the earth, and plate tectonics. Includes a weekly lab.

Physical Geology G201 is intended for both geology majors and nonmajors, and is the first term of a year of beginning college geology. Physical Geology is concerned with earth materials and geologic processes acting on the earth. G201 deals mainly with rocks and minerals, and introduces students to internally-driven geologic processes. This course can be used to partly fulfill graduation requirements for the Associate Degree, and has been approved for block transfer. The text and materials have been chosen by the faculty and the emphasis of the course will be the viewpoint of the author(s). This includes the concepts of geologic time and the evolution of the Earth.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted. MTH 95 or MTH98 accepted.

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

  • Use an understanding of rock and mineral characterization and classification to infer the geologic processes which formed individual rock and mineral specimens.
  • Analyze the development, scope, and limitations of plate tectonics and utilize plate tectonics to explain the Earth’s earthquake and volcanic activity as well as the occurrence of common rocks, minerals, and economic deposits.
  • Access earth science information from a variety of sources, evaluate the quality of this information, and compare this information with current models of solid earth processes, identifying areas of congruence and discrepancy.
  • Make field and laboratory-based observations and measurements of rocks and minerals and/or Earth’s internal process, use scientific reasoning to interpret these observations and measurements, and compare the results with current models of solid earth processes identifying areas of congruence and discrepancy.
  • Use scientifically valid modes of inquiry, individually and collaboratively, to critically evaluate the hazards and risks posed by volcanoes and earthquakes both to themselves and society as a whole, evaluate the efficacy of possible ethically robust responses to these hazards and risks, and effectively communicate the results of this analysis to their peers.
  • Assess the contributions of physical geology to our evolving understanding of global change and sustainability while placing the development of physical geology in its historical and cultural context.

G 202 : Earth Surface Processes

Introduces physical geology which deals with mass wasting, streams, glaciers, deserts, beaches, groundwater, and use of topographic maps. Includes a weekly lab.

Physical Geology G202 is intended for both geology majors and non-majors, and is the second term of a year of beginning college geology. Physical Geology is concerned with earth materials and geologic processes acting on the earth. G202 deals mainly with surficial geologic processes. This course can be used to partly fulfill graduation requirements for the Associate Degree, and has been approved for block transfer. The text and materials have been chosen by the faculty and the emphasis of the course will be the viewpoint of the author(s). This includes the concepts of geologic time and the evolution of the Earth.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted. MTH 95 or MTH98 accepted.

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

  • Use an understanding of landform characterization and classification to infer the geologic processes which formed specific landforms.
  • Analyze how earth materials, uplift, subsidence, erosion, transport, deposition, climate, biological activity, and time interact to create landscapes.
  • Access earth science information from a variety of sources, evaluate the quality of this information, and compare this information with current models of earth surface processes, identifying areas of congruence and discrepancy.
  • Make field and laboratory-based observations and measurements of landforms and/or surface processes, use scientific reasoning to interpret these observations and measurements, and compare the results with current models of earth surface processes identifying areas of congruence and discrepancy.
  • Use scientifically valid modes of inquiry, individually and collaboratively, to critically evaluate the hazards and risks posed by flooding, slope processes and coastal erosion both to themselves and society as a whole, evaluate the efficacy of possible ethically robust responses to these hazards and risks, and effectively communicate the results of this analysis to their peers.
  • Assess the contributions of physical geology to our evolving understanding of global change and sustainability while placing the development of physical geology in its historical and cultural context.

G 203 : Evolution of Planet Earth

Introduces historical geology which deals with geologic time, fossils, stratigraphic principles, and the geologic history of the North American continent. Includes a weekly lab.

Historical Geology is intended for both geology majors and non-majors, and is the third term of a year of beginning college geology. This course can be used to partly fulfill graduation requirements for the Associate Degree, and has been approved for block transfer. The text and materials have been chosen by the faculty and the emphasis of the course will be the viewpoint of the author(s). This includes the concepts of geologic time and the evolution of the Earth.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted. MTH 95 or MTH 98 accepted.

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

  • Use an understanding of sedimentary rock and fossil characterization and classification to infer the past environments recorded in specific geologic areas.
  • Analyze how relative and absolute dating have been used to construct and refine the geological time scale.
  • Use their understanding of earth systems and biological evolution to explain major events in the geologic record.
  • Access earth science information from a variety of sources, evaluate the quality of this information, and compare this information with current models of earth history, identifying areas of congruence and discrepancy.
  • Make field and laboratory-based observations and measurements of landscapes, rocks and fossils, use scientific reasoning to interpret these observations and measurements, and compare the results with of current models of earth history, identifying areas of congruence and discrepancy.
  • Assess the contributions of historical geology to our evolving understanding of global change and sustainability while placing the development of historical geology in its historical and cultural context.

G 207 : Geology of the Pacific Northwest

Introduces the regional geology of the Pacific Northwest with emphasis on Oregon geology. Includes basic geologic principles, earth materials and geology of Pacific Northwest provinces.

Geology of the Pacific Northwest (G207) is a one-term introductory course in geology. The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with basic geologic principles and the general geology of the Pacific Northwest. The emphasis is on the geology of Oregon and Washington. This course can be used to partly fulfill graduation requirements for the Associate Degree, and has been approved for block transfer. The text and materials have been chosen by the faculty and the emphasis of the course will be the viewpoint of the author(s). This includes the geologic time scale and the evolution of the Earth.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted. MTH 58 or MTH 65 accepted.

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

  • Use an understanding of earth materials and landforms to infer the surficial and internal processes which formed the landscape and underlying geology of the physiographic provinces of the Pacific Northwest.
  • Use an understanding of plate tectonics and surficial processes to unravel the sequence of geologic events which have acted over time to create the physiographic provinces of the Pacific Northwest from diverse geologic terranes.
  • Access earth science information about the Pacific Northwest from a variety of sources, evaluate the quality of this information, and compare this information with current models of the formation and development of the physiographic provinces of the Pacific Northwest, identifying areas of congruence and discrepancy.
  • Make field and laboratory based observations and measurements of earth materials and landforms, use scientific reasoning to interpret these observations and measurements, and compare the results with current models of geological processes affecting the Pacific Northwest, identifying areas of congruence and discrepancy.
  • Use scientifically valid modes of inquiry, individually and collaboratively, to critically evaluate the hazards and risks posed by the geological processes which are still shaping the Pacific Northwest both to themselves and society as a whole, evaluate the efficacy of possible ethically robust responses to these risks, and effectively communicate the results of this analysis to their peers.
  • Assess the contributions of physical and historical geology to our evolving understanding of global change and sustainability while placing the development of the geology of the Pacific Northwest in its historical and cultural context.

G 208 : Volcanoes and Their Activity

Covers the origin, activity, products, classification, and hazards of volcanoes.

Volcanoes and Their Activity (G208) is a one-term introductory course in volcanology, which is a branch of the science of geology. The student will develop an understanding of the types, origin, activity, products, and hazards of volcanoes. This course can be used to partly fulfill graduation requirements for the Associate Degree, and has been approved for block transfer. The text and materials have been chosen by the faculty and the emphasis of the course will be the viewpoint of the author(s). This includes the geologic time scale and the evolution of the Earth.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted. MTH 58 or MTH 65 accepted.

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

  • Use an understanding of rock and mineral characterization and classification to infer the igneous processes which formed individual rock and mineral specimens.
  • Analyze the development, scope, and limitations of plate tectonics, and utilize plate tectonics to explain the Earth’s volcanic activity, and the relationship of this activity to climate change, agriculture, and formation of economic deposits.
  • Access volcano science information from a variety of sources, evaluate the quality of this information, and compare this information with current models of volcanic processes, identifying areas of congruence and discrepancy.
  • Make field and laboratory-based observations and measurements of volcanic rocks and minerals and/or volcanic landforms, use scientific reasoning to interpret these observations and measurements, and compare the results with current models of volcanic processes identifying areas of congruence and discrepancy.
  • Use scientifically valid modes of inquiry, individually and collaboratively, to critically evaluate the hazards and risks posed by volcanoes both to themselves and society as a whole, evaluate the efficacy of possible ethically robust responses to these risks, and effectively communicate the results of this analysis to their peers.
  • Assess the contributions of volcanology to our evolving understanding of global change and sustainability while placing the development of volcanology in its historical and cultural context.