History

Classes

HST 101 : History of Western Civilization: Ancient to Medieval

Explores the ancient civilizations of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, and Rome. Covers development of Judeo-Christian beliefs, early Islamic civilization, Byzantine civilization, and early medieval Europe.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon completion of the course student should be able to:

  • Articulate and interpret an understanding of key historical facts and events in the ancient world and early medieval Europe.
  • Identify the influence of culturally based practices, values, and beliefs to analyze how historically defined meanings of difference affect human behavior.
  • Identify and investigate historical theses, evaluate information and its sources, and use appropriate reasoning to construct evidence-based arguments on historical issues.
  • Construct a well organized historical argument using effective, appropriate, and accurate language.

HST 102 : History of Western Civilization: Medieval to Modern

Covers the High Middle Ages and early modern Europe, including the Renaissance, Reformation, Scientific Revolution, Enlightenment and the French Revolution.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

  • Articulate and interpret an understanding of key historical facts and events in late medieval and early modern Europe.
  • Identify the influence of culturally based practices, values, and beliefs to analyze how historically defined meanings of difference affect human behavior.
  • Identify and investigate historical theses, evaluate information and its sources, and use appropriate reasoning to construct evidence-based arguments on historical issues.
  • Construct a well organized historical argument using effective, appropriate, and accurate language.

HST 103 : History of Western Civilization: Modern Europe

Covers the history of nineteenth- and twentieth-century Europe, including the Industrial Revolution, nationalism, imperialism, socialism, the Russian Revolution, Nazism, world wars and their aftermath.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

  • Articulate and interpret an understanding of key historical facts and events in modern Europe.
  • Identify the influence of culturally based practices, values, and beliefs to analyze how historically defined meanings of difference affect human behavior.
  • Identify and investigate historical theses, evaluate information and its sources, and use appropriate reasoning to construct evidence-based arguments on historical issues.
  • Construct a well-organized historical argument using effective, appropriate, and accurate language.

HST 104 : History of the Middle East

Surveys the Middle East from ancient to modern times. Includes political, diplomatic, economic, social, religious and cultural themes.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

  • Articulate and interpret an understanding of key historical facts and events in the history of the Middle East.
  • Identify the influence of culturally based practices, values, and beliefs to analyze how historically defined meanings of difference affect human behavior.
  • Identify and investigate historical theses, evaluate information and its sources, and use appropriate reasoning to construct evidence-based arguments on historical issues.
  • Construct a well organized historical argument using effective, appropriate, and accurate language.

HST 105 : History of India and South Asia Region

Introduces the history of India and the South Asian region. Includes political, diplomatic, economic, social, religious, and cultural themes from pre-history to modern times.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Articulate and interpret an understanding of key historical facts and events in the history of India and South Asia.
  • Identify the influence of culturally based practices, values, and beliefs to analyze how historically defined meanings of difference affect human behavior.
  • Identify and investigate historical theses, evaluate information and its sources, and use appropriate reasoning to construct evidence-based arguments on historical issues.
  • Construct a well organized historical argument using effective, appropriate, and accurate language.

HST 106 : History of China

Introduces the history of China. Includes political, diplomatic, economic,social, religious, and cultural themes from pre-history to modern times.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Articulate and interpret an understanding of key historical facts and events in the history of China.
  • Identify the influence of culturally based practices, values, and beliefs to analyze how historically defined meanings of difference affect human behavior.
  • Identify and investigate historical theses, evaluate information and its sources, and use appropriate reasoning to construct evidence-based arguments on historical issues.
  • Construct a well organized historical argument using effective, appropriate, and accurate language.

HST 107 : History of Korea and Japan

Explores the history of Korea and Japan and their dynamic relationship from pre-history to modern times. Includes political, diplomatic, economic, social, religious, and cultural themes.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Articulate and interpret an understanding of key historical facts and events in the history of Korea and Japan.
  • Identify the influence of culturally based practices, values, and beliefs to analyze how historically defined meanings of difference affect human behavior.
  • Identify and investigate historical theses, evaluate information and its sources, and use appropriate reasoning to construct evidence-based arguments on historical issues.
  • Construct a well organized historical argument using effective, appropriate, and accurate language.

HST 201 : History of the United States to 1840

Examines the social, political, economic and cultural developments of Colonial America and the Early Republic of the United States. Includes: Native Americans pre- and post- European colonization (Spanish, French, Dutch and English); European indentured servitude and African slavery; Salem Witch Trials; Great Awakening; French and Indian War; Declaration of Independence and the American Revolution; Constitution and the Bill of Rights; Whiskey Rebellion; War of 1812; Missouri Compromise; American Indian Removal. History courses are non-sequential and may be taken in any term and in any order.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Articulate and interpret an understanding of key historical facts and events in Colonial America and the early United States.
  • Identify the influence of culturally based practices, values, and beliefs to analyze how historically defined meanings of difference affect human behavior.
  • Identify and investigate historical theses, evaluate information and its sources, and use appropriate reasoning to construct evidence-based arguments on historical issues.
  • Construct a well organized historical argument using effective, appropriate, and accurate language.

HST 202 : History of the United States 1840-1914

Examines the social, political, economic and cultural developments of the United States from 1840 to 1914. Includes: the Women's Rights Movement, Manifest Destiny, the U.S.- Mexican War, slavery, abolitionism and the growing sectional crisis between the North and South, Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War, Reconstruction, westward migration and its impact on Native Americans, America's overseas empire, and the Progressive Era. History courses are non-sequential and may be taken in any term and in any order.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion, students should be able to:

  • Articulate and interpret an understanding of key historical facts and events in the United States from 1840 to 1914.
  • Identify the influence of culturally based practices, values, and beliefs to analyze how historically defined meanings of difference affect human behavior.
  • Identify and investigate historical theses, evaluate information and its sources, and use appropriate reasoning to construct evidence-based arguments on historical issues.
  • Construct a well organized historical argument using effective, appropriate, and accurate language.

HST 203 : History of the United States 1914 to Present

Examines the social, political, economic, and cultural developments of the United States from 1914 to the present. Includes: World War I; 19th Amendment (women's suffrage); "roaring" 1920s; civil liberties; Great Depression; World War II; Cold War (Korea, "Red Scare," Cuban missile crisis, Vietnam, fall of the Berlin Wall); Civil Rights movements, legislation and Martin Luther King, Jr.; The Great Society and War on Poverty; Watergate and Iran/Contra scandals; 9/11. History courses are non-sequential and may be taken in any term and in any order.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Articulate and interpret an understanding of key historical facts and events in the twentieth and twenty first century history of the United States.
  • Identify the influence of culturally based practices, values, and beliefs to analyze how historically defined meanings of difference affect human behavior.
  • Identify and investigate historical theses, evaluate information and its sources, and use appropriate reasoning to construct evidence-based arguments on historical issues.
  • Construct a well organized historical argument using effective, appropriate, and accurate language.

HST 204 : History of Women in the U.S.: Pre-colonial to 1877

Examines the lives of women in terms of family relations, religion, culture, sexuality and reproduction, and work roles, as well as educational opportunities and social reform activities. Explores diversity in terms of class, race, ethnicity, legal status, and region. History courses are non-sequential and may be taken in any term and in any order.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Articulate and interpret an understanding of key historical facts and events in U.S. History from pre-European settlement to 1877, and their particular impact on women.
  • Identify the influence of culturally based practices, values, and beliefs to analyze how historically defined meanings of difference affect human behavior.
  • Identify and investigate historical theses, evaluate information and its sources, and use appropriate reasoning to construct evidence-based arguments on historical issues.
  • Construct a well organized historical argument using effective, appropriate, and accurate language.

HST 205 : History of Women in the U.S.: 1877 to Present

Examines women's work in the maturing industrial economy, women's reform activities, and changing family and social relationships. Explores class, ethnic, racial, and regional diversity. History courses are non-sequential and may be taken in any term and in any order.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Articulate and interpret an understanding of key historical facts and events in U.S. History from 1877 to the present, and their particular impact on women.
  • Identify the influence of culturally based practices, values, and beliefs to analyze how historically defined meanings of difference affect human behavior.
  • Identify and investigate historical theses, evaluate information and its sources, and use appropriate reasoning to construct evidence-based arguments on historical issues.
  • Construct a well organized historical argument using effective, appropriate, and accurate language.

HST 218 : American Indian History

Covers history of American Indians in what is now the United States from pre-Columbian times to the present, exploring the cultural diversity among Native peoples, tribal sovereignty, conflicts and accommodations with European Americans, and the historical roots of contemporary issues that emphasize American Indians as a vital part of the shared history of the United States.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Articulate and interpret an understanding of key historical facts and events in American Indian history.
  • Identify the influence of culturally based practices, values, and beliefs to analyze how historically defined meanings of difference affect human behavior.
  • Identify and investigate historical theses, evaluate information and its sources, and use appropriate reasoning to construct evidence-based arguments on historical issues.
  • Construct a well organized historical argument using effective, appropriate, and accurate language.

HST 225 : History of Women, Sex, and the Family

Examines the historical and cultural variations in family life and sexuality in the 19th and 20th centuries in an international context (including the United States) through topics such as courtship, marriage, reproduction, violence, colonialism, homosexuality, and work.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Articulate and interpret an understanding of key historical facts and events in the history of family life and women.
  • Identify the influence of culturally based practices, values, and beliefs to analyze how historically defined meanings of difference affect human behavior.
  • Identify and investigate historical theses, evaluate information and its sources, and use appropriate reasoning to construct evidence-based arguments on historical issues.
  • Construct a well organized historical argument using effective, appropriate, and accurate language.

HST 240 : Oregon History

Examines the rich and diverse history of Oregon including the significance of Oregon's frontier heritage and Oregon's role in American history from pre-European contact to the modern era. Explores economic, political, social, and cultural factors in terms of race, ethnicity, gender, class, and religion.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Articulate and interpret an understanding of key historical facts and events in Oregon history.
  • Identify the influence of culturally based practices, values, and beliefs to analyze how historically defined meanings of difference affect human behavior.
  • Identify and investigate historical theses, evaluate information and its sources, and use appropriate reasoning to construct evidence-based arguments on historical issues.
  • Construct a well organized historical argument using effective, appropriate, and accurate language.

HST 270 : History of Mexico

Surveys Mexican history from pre-Columbian to modern times. Focus on post contact history: the Spanish conquest, colonial Mexico, independence and its aftermath to contemporary times. Emphasizes social, political, and cultural developments and contributions by a diversity of Mexico's peoples.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Articulate and interpret an understanding of key historical facts and events in the history of Mexico.
  • Identify the influence of culturally based practices, values, and beliefs to analyze how historically defined meanings of difference affect human behavior.
  • Identify and investigate historical theses, evaluate information and its sources, and use appropriate reasoning to construct evidence-based arguments on historical issues.
  • Construct a well organized historical argument using effective, appropriate, and accurate language.

HST 271 : History of Central America and the Caribbean

Covers Central American and Caribbean history from the pre-Columbian era to the present. Focuses on post-contact history including colonialism, independence, revolution, nation-building and international relationships. Emphasizes social, political and cultural developments and contributions by a diversity of Central American and Caribbean peoples.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Articulate and interpret an understanding of key historical facts and events in the history of Central America and the Caribbean.
  • Identify the influence of culturally-based practices, values, and beliefs to analyze how historically-defined meanings of difference affect human behavior.
  • Identify and investigate historical theses, evaluate information and its sources, and use appropriate reasoning to construct evidence-based arguments on historical issues.
  • Construct a well-organized historical argument using effective, appropriate, and accurate language.

HST 277 : History of the Oregon Trail

Examines the history of the Oregon Trail including the predecessors of the route, the motivations of the people who used the route, the trail and its variations, life along the trail, and the impact of the migration.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Articulate and interpret an understanding of key historical facts and events in the history of westward migration along the Oregon Trail.
  • Identify the influence of culturally-based practices, values, and beliefs to analyze how historically-defined meanings of difference affect human behavior.
  • Identify and investigate historical theses, evaluate information and its sources, and use appropriate reasoning to construct evidence-based arguments on historical issues.
  • Construct a well-organized historical argument using effective, appropriate, and accurate language.

HST 279 : Russian History II

Surveys the cultural, social, political, and economic forces that shaped Russian history from the late eighteenth century to the present.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Articulate and interpret an understanding of key historical facts and events in Russian history from the late eighteenth century to the present.
  • Identify the influence of culturally based practices, values, and beliefs to analyze how historically defined meanings of difference affect human behavior.
  • Identify and investigate historical theses, evaluate information and its sources, and use appropriate reasoning to construct evidence-based arguments on historical issues.
  • Construct a well organized historical argument using effective, appropriate, and accurate language.

HST 285 : The Holocaust

Introduces the aftermath of World War I and the rise of the Nazis, the historical roots of anti-Semitism, the evolution of the Final Solution and its coordination in Nazi-occupied Europe, the victims of Nazi policies, the camps, the perpetrators, bystanders, and the aftermath of the Holocaust.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

  • Articulate and interpret an understanding of key historical facts and events during the Holocaust.
  • Identify the influence of culturally based practices, values, and beliefs to analyze how historically defined meanings of difference affect human behavior.
  • Identify and investigate historical theses, evaluate information and its sources, and use appropriate reasoning to construct evidence-based arguments on historical issues.
  • Construct a well organized historical argument using effective, appropriate, and accurate language.