Psychology

Classes

PSY 101 : Psychology and Human Relations

Applies psychological principles to relationships in both personal and professional environments. Includes an overview of basic personality and social psychology concepts, as well as specific skill development in the areas of communication, listening, and conflict resolution.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Apply an understanding of psychological and social influences on human behavior to objectively analyze one’s own interpersonal experiences and relationships.
  • Utilize intra- and interpersonal management skills to increase effectiveness in personal and professional relationships.
  • Use knowledge of culturally diverse practices to increase sensitivity and competence in a variety of social and cultural interactions.
  • Communicate, listen, and manage conflict more effectively in personal and professional relationships.

PSY 201A : Introduction to Psychology - Part 1

Surveys the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, empirical findings, and historical trends in scientific research, biological psychology, sensation and perception, learning theory, memory, language, cognition, consciousness, and human development. Provides an overview of popular trends, examines the overarching themes of heredity vs. environment, stability vs. change, and free will vs. determinism, and emphasizes the sociocultural approach which assumes that gender, culture, and ethnicity are essential to understanding behavior, thought, and emotion. Psychology 201A is the first term of a two-term sequence in introductory psychology.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Articulate how psychological research adheres to ethical and scientific principles, and communicate the difference between personal views and scientific evidence in understanding behavior.
  • Delineate the credentials, skills, and experiences required for a career path in psychology and identify broad career opportunities associated with the various subfields of psychology at different educational levels.
  • Recognize and respect human diversity while anticipating that psychological explanations may vary across populations and contexts, and exhibit sensitivity to feelings, emotions, motives, and attitudes regarding specific behavioral concerns.
  • Analyze personal lifestyle and apply problem-solving techniques to situations while understanding the limitations of one’s psychological knowledge and skills, recognizing that ethically complex situations can develop in the application of psychological principles.
  • Evaluate public and private assumptions concerning individual and group differences using a global and multifaceted sociocultural approach.

PSY 202A : Introduction to Psychology - Part 2

Surveys the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, empirical findings, and historical trends in personality theory, psychological disorders, therapy, emotion, motivation, intelligence, health psychology, and social psychology. Provides an overview of popular trends, examines the overarching themes of heredity vs. environment, stability vs. change, and free will vs. determinism, and emphasizes the sociocultural approach which assumes that gender, culture, and ethnicity are essential to understanding behavior, thought, and emotion. Psychology 202A is the second term of a two-term sequence in introductory psychology.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Analyze personal lifestyle and apply problem-solving techniques to situations while understanding the limitations of one’s psychological knowledge and skills, recognizing that ethically complex situations can develop in the application of psychological principles.
  • Recognize and respect human diversity while anticipating that psychological explanations may vary across populations and contexts, and
  • exhibit sensitivity to feelings, emotions, motives, and attitudes regarding specific behavioral concerns.
  • Discern the difference between personal views and scientific evidence and identify claims arising from myths, stereotypes, common
  • fallacies, and poorly supported assertions regarding behavior.
  • Articulate the ways that psychological theories can facilitate personal, social, and organizational change, describe issues pertaining to psychological aspects of human dignity, and anticipate that psychological explanations may vary among populations and contexts.
  • Evaluate public and private assumptions concerning individual and group differences using a global and multifaceted sociocultural approach.

PSY 213 : Introduction to Behavioral Neuroscience

Surveys the role of the brain and nervous system in behavior, psychological functioning, and neurophysiological processes that underlie human development.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted. PSY 201A or one year of biology accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Identify the brain’s neuroanatomy and its functions throughout the nervous system to understand behavior and mental processes.
  • Use the human sensory system to understand the biology of sleep and the role of the visual system, and the functions of sustaining life.
  • Use an understanding of neurophysiology principles to associate the effects of psychopharmacology on human development and, pathological behavior.
  • Evaluate and understand the role of brain functioning in the development, diagnosis, and treatment of brain-based disorders
  • Apply an understanding of brain functioning to the conduct of one’s own life.
  • Apply this knowledge to abilities including attention, learning, perception of others and decision making.

PSY 214 : Introduction to Personality

Covers a variety of personality theories including the theoretical and scientific explanations for individuals' characteristic patterns of perception, thought, emotion and behavior. Emphasizes the understanding and mastery of personality constructs applied to students' personal and professional lives.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Analyze the determinants of personality characteristics to better understand their effects on cognitions, emotions, and behavior.
  • Think critically about and apply theoretical and research-based explanations for human behavior in order to successfully negotiate the
  • challenges of daily living.
  • Apply the major personality domains and theories to better understand one’s own behavior and the behavior of others.

PSY 215 : Human Development

Surveys major developmental theories and patterns of change and continuity from birth to death in human subjects. Emphasizes biological, cognitive, and emotional development through the lifespan. Examines cultural influences on development.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Students should be able to:

  • Utilize knowledge of variables that influence development throughout the life span and apply this knowledge to become more effective parents, professionals, and citizens of the global community.
  • Relate the scientific knowledge of development from conception to death including the biological, emotional, cognitive, and psychosocial influences in order to make effective personal and professional decisions.
  • Evaluate research using a multidisciplinary view of development that includes cross-cultural perspectives.
  • Apply critical thinking to analyze and problem solve the developmental concerns from birth to death.
  • Utilize knowledge of prenatal and child development, cognitive foundations of intelligence, and emotional development throughout the lifespan to evaluate and improve human potential.

PSY 216 : Social Psychology

Surveys the scientific study of how individuals think about, influence, and relate to one another with respect to social beliefs, persuasion, attraction, conformity, obedience, prejudice, aggression, and pro-social behaviors.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Apply an understanding of the impact of social and cultural forces on one’s sense of self, values, and beliefs to more effectively analyze human
  • thinking and behaviors.
  • Critically evaluate research to understand and explain confusing, conflictual or distressing human social behavior.
  • Relate social psychological concepts and theories to the context of historic and current world, national, and local events, as well as to understanding one’s own life experiences.
  • Apply social psychological concepts and theories to reduce anti-social attitudes and behaviors and increase pro-social attitudes and behaviors within individuals and groups. 

PSY 222 : Family & Intimate Relationships

Explores processes involved in both traditional and non-traditional relationships and families: including love, cohabitation, dating, marriage, parenting, communication and conflict resolution, sexuality, balancing work and family, domestic violence, divorce, remarriage, and blended families.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Critically evaluate scientific research (including electronic and peer-reviewed databases) and media reports concerning intimate relationships in order to make more informed decisions about one’s own relationships.
  • Apply knowledge about cultural differences in relationship patterns to better understand and appreciate diverse belief systems in one’s own and others’ relationships.
  • Use knowledge of communication, conflict resolution, sexuality, power, attraction, and social cognition to establish, develop and maintain satisfying intimate relationships.

PSY 231 : Human Sexuality

Explores sexual issues from scientific and humanistic perspectives. Surveys historical, cultural and cross-cultural variation in sexuality, sex research, female and male sexual and reproductive anatomy and physiology, gender issues, sexual response, sexual communication, sexual behavior patterns, love, and sexual orientations. This is the first course in a two-course sequence.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Improve sexual health and functioning through the critical evaluation of scientific and popular information.
  • Practice sexual health and enhance sexual satisfaction based on a) the knowledge of sexual anatomy and physiology, b) the ability to communicate effectively about sexuality with partners, family members, and health-care providers, and c) understanding of psychological influences on sexual decision-making and health behaviors.
  • Use an understanding of historical, biological, social, psychological, and cultural contexts of diverse sexual practices in order to be accepting of others’ consensual behaviors.
  • Be open to and accepting of diversity in others’ gender identity, gender role expression, sexual orientation and variations, in order to promote community well-being.
  • Establish, maintain, and enhance intimate relationships through the utilization of research based principles.

PSY 232 : Human Sexuality

Explores sexual issues from scientific and humanistic perspectives. Surveys sexuality through the life cycle, sexual problems, sexual satisfaction, contraception, conception, sexuality and disability, sex and chronic illness, sexually transmitted infections, sexual victimization, atypical sexual behavior, and the commercialization of sex. This is the second course in a two course sequence.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Enhance relationships with sexual partners and the community through knowledge of biological, psychological and cultural milestones in human sexual development.
  • Effectively manage sexual problems and develop broader understanding of those with chronic illnesses and disabilities that impact sexual functioning.
  • Make informed decisions about contraception, abortion, pregnancy and the birthing process through knowledge of human reproduction, psychosocial and cultural factors.
  • Implement safer sex practices through awareness, treatment and effective communication with partners and diverse community members regarding sexually transmitted infections.
  • Enhance satisfaction with sexual relationships through informed decisions utilizing knowledge of problematic (coercive, paraphilic) and functional (consensual, atypical) sexual behaviors.

PSY 236 : Psychology of Adult Development and Aging

Provides an overview of the biological, cognitive, and psychosocial aspects of adulthood and aging including theories of aging and specific research in the field of gerontology. Focuses on genetic and environmental factors that influence health as we age. Includes the challenges specific to gender, ability level, and culture.

Topics include age-related changes in memory and other cognitive abilities, self-perceptions, mental health (including addictions, Alzheimer's Disease and other dementias), personality changes, coping with stress as well as changes that arise as people adapt to various life transitions (widowhood, retirement, loss, etc.). Myths and stereotypes associated with aging are examined as they relate to specific effects on individuals.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

  • Use knowledge of biological, cognitive, and psychosocial processes in order to assist self and others to understand various aging trajectories.
  • Assess the psychosocial needs of specific adult populations with varying physical and cognitive functioning levels and plan how those needs could be met within specific living situations.
  • Critically evaluate research on biological, cognitive, and psychosocial issues as they arise in a rapidly changing and aging world.
  • Apply concepts from developmental psychology to optimize aging in self and others.

PSY 239 : Introduction to Abnormal Psychology

Surveys the history, theories, etiology, assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of the spectrum of psychological disorders.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted. PSY 201A or PSY202A may be accepted.

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

  • Enhance personal and social interactions by using the knowledge of the history and major theories of abnormal behavior.
  • Better understand one’s own and others’ behavior by applying the knowledge of assessment, diagnosis, classification systems and DSM categories.
  • Become a more effective consumer of and advocate for mental health care services through an understanding of the various approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of psychological disorders.

PSY 240 : Personal Awareness and Growth

Explores multidimensional perspectives on personal growth and awareness, and how to apply this knowledge to healthy cognitive and behavioral practices in daily living. Covers dimensions of growth including physical, intrapersonal, interpersonal, cognitive, occupational/educational, communal/environmental, and spiritual. Introduces various aspects of personal growth including how childhood and adolescent development and experiences affect thinking, feelings, and behavior; differentiation; self-discipline and resilience; authentic happiness; love and relationships; stress management; creative expression; body image and awareness; education and job/career pursuits; loneliness and solitude; death; and loss.

 

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

  • Describe seven dimensions of personal growth (physical, intrapersonal, interpersonal, cognitive, occupational/educational, communal/environmental, and spiritual) and specific indicators of awareness and growth in each of these dimensions.
  • Apply current psychological research (in cognitive-behavioral therapy, positive psychology, neuroscience, environmental and community psychology, assertive communication, stress management, and resilience) with the intention of achieving more satisfying and constructive everyday thinking and behavior.
  • Explain how the concept of personal growth varies cross-culturally and developmentally, and how one can, using critical thinking and personal reflection, effectively use this knowledge to be more flexible with differences in personal and professional relationships.