Sociology

Classes

SOC 204 : Sociology in Everyday Life

Introduces the sociological perspective and the scientific study of human social behavior. Focuses on the core concepts, theories, and research on human interactions within social groups and how people are shaped by their social locations (status, roles, race, class, sex, age, etc.) within society's structures, stratification systems, and institutions, and by cultural processes such as socialization and group dynamics.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Apply sociological perspectives and the sociological imagination in their everyday lives, to reflect on structural and cultural contexts and current events.
  • Identify social inequality and stratification systems to evaluate the impact on societies.
  • Participate as active citizens in their societies and communities, demonstrating respect for diversity, critical thinking, and collaboration.

SOC 205 : Social Change in Societies

Explores how societies change by utilizing sociological perspectives to compare and contrast the impacts of changes on individuals and our social institutions (such as the family, economy, politics, education, and religion).

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Apply sociological perspectives and use their sociological imagination in their reflections on the causes of social change and the impact of change on people and social institutions.
  • Locate themselves (connect their personal biography and social status with societal history) in the process of social change and social movements.
  • Participate as active citizens in their societies and communities, demonstrating respect for diversity, critical thinking, and collaboration.

SOC 206 : Social Problems

Applies the sociological perspective to the study of social problems, including their identification, analyses of causes and consequences, and considerations of possible solutions. Explores topics such as inequality, poverty, crime and delinquency, substance abuse, discrimination, domestic violence, the environment, global stratification, and international conflict.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completions students should be able to:

  • Apply sociological perspectives and use their sociological imagination in analyzing the causes and consequences of social problems and evaluating
  • social actions and policies.
  • Locate themselves within social contexts (connect their personal biography and social status with societal history) to reflect on the processes that shape and address social problems.
  • Participate as active citizens in their societies and communities, demonstrating respect for diversity, critical thinking, and collaboration in problem-solving.

SOC 213 : Diversity in the United States

Frames social status differences within the context of social structure and culture. Examines how inequalities and privilege play out through social status and are reinforced through both culture and social structure. Includes statuses such as: race, gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, age, etc. Includes concepts such as: privilege, social stratification, cultural bias, institutional inequality, and social construction.

This course provides a sweeping sociological overview of diversity in the United States. While covering the specific areas of race, ethnicity, gender, age, social class, and sexual orientations, it also deals with topics generally related to diversity. For example, concepts and topics such as the following are typically included: racism, sexism, stratification, stereotyping and ethnocentrism, hate violence, youth violence, and immigration laws and impacts.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Students successfully completing this course will be able to do the following:

  • Apply sociological perspectives and use their sociological imagination in analyzing the causes and consequences of social inequality and evaluating social actions and policies as they reproduce privilege and institutional discrimination.
  • Locate themselves within their various social statuses and how those play out social contexts (connect their personal biography and social status with societal history) to reflect on the processes that shape and address the structure and operation of systems of stratification.
  • Participate as active citizens in their societies and communities, demonstrating respect for diversity, critical thinking, and collaboration in addressing inequality and privilege as it exists in current social actions and contexts.

SOC 214A : Illumination Project: Tools for Creative Social Activism 1

Applies the sociological perspective to the study of social problems and possible solutions. Explores topics such as institutional privilege, power and oppression, social identity, cultural assumptions and discrimination. Includes social analysis, group facilitation, social change interventions, creative production and basic acting. This is the first course of a three course sequence.

Students in this course will create live interactive theater performances that will be toured through out PCC campuses with some community performances. The performances are geared toward creating a campus and community climate that is inclusive and respectful of all people’s culture, ethnicity, class, gender and sexual orientation, and other diversity. This course is a required component of The Illumination Project.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted. Instructor permission required.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Apply sociological perspectives and use their sociological imagination in analyzing the causes and consequences of social problems and evaluating
  • social actions and reactions.
  • Locate themselves within social contexts (connect their personal biography and social status with societal history) to reflect on the processes that shape and address social problems.
  • Empathize with people, cultures and communities from backgrounds different than themselves.
  • Employ knowledge of group processing, written and oral communication skills, artistic presentation and active listening in order to engage in community change and civic action.

SOC 214B : Illumination Project: Tools for Creative Social Activism 2

Applies the sociological perspective to the study of social problems and possible solutions. Explores topics such as racism, immigration, xenophobia, institutional privilege and oppression and social activism through classroom and community presentations utilizing interactive theater. Includes social analysis, group facilitation, social change interventions, creative production and basic acting. This is the second course of a three course sequence.

Students in this course will create live interactive theater performances that will be toured through out PCC campuses with some community performances. The performances are geared toward creating a campus and community climate that is inclusive and respectful of all people’s culture, ethnicity, class, gender and sexual orientation, and other diversity. This course is a required component of The Illumination Project.  

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Instructor permission required.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Apply sociological perspectives and use their sociological imagination in analyzing the causes and consequences of social problems and evaluating
  • social actions and reactions.
  • Locate themselves within social contexts (connect their personal biography and social status with societal history) to reflect on the processes that shape and address social problems.
  • Empathize with people, cultures and communities from backgrounds different than themselves.
  • Employ knowledge of group processing, written and oral communication skills, artistic presentation and active listening in order to engage in community change and civic action.
  • Use an understanding of social theories to educate others about institutional oppression and inequities based on racism and xenophobia as well as potential solutions to social problems.

SOC 214C : Illumination Project: Tools for Creative Social Activism 3

Applies the sociological perspective to the study of social problems and possible solutions. Explores institutional oppression and social activism through classroom and community presentations utilizing interactive theater. Includes social analysis, group facilitation, educational methods and practice, social change interventions, creative production and basic acting. This is the third course of a three course sequence.

Students in this course will create live interactive theater performances that will be toured through out campus with some community performances. The performances are geared toward creating a campus and community climate that is inclusive and respectful of all people’s culture, ethnicity, class, gender and sexual orientation, and other diversity. This course is a required component of The Illumination Project.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Instructor permission required.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Apply sociological perspectives and use their sociological imagination in analyzing the causes and consequences of social problems and evaluating social actions and reactions.
  • Locate themselves within social contexts (connect their personal biography and social status with societal history) to reflect on the processes that shape and address social problems.
  • Empathize with people, cultures and communities from backgrounds different than themselves.
  • Employ knowledge of group processing, written and oral communication skills, artistic presentation and active listening in order to engage in community change and civic action.
  • Use an understanding of social theories to educate others about institutional oppression based on culturally defined meanings of difference as well as potential solutions to those social problems.
  • Be prepared to facilitate difficult dialogues at a basic level around controversial social issues in a community and academic setting.

SOC 218 : Sociology of Gender

Focuses on how socialization is affected by gender. Topics include how gender is reflected in culture through values, norms, language, media, power, violence, various theoretical approaches, significant social institutions, social movements and issues.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Students successfully completing this course will be able to apply the sociological perspective to the causes and consequences of gender roles in our lives and in the world around us and be able to identify and assess how interactions between gender, class, and race/ethnicity contribute to the stratification of society.