Biology

Classes

BI 101 : Biology

Introduces the properties of life, morphology and physiology of cells, cell chemistry, energy transformation, and the basic principles of ecology. A laboratory science course designed for non-biology majors.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

  • Apply knowledge of the structures and functions of biological molecules, cells, populations, communities and ecosystems, to solve interdisciplinary problems.
  • Gather information, assess its validity, and differentiate factual information from opinion and pseudo-science by practicing methods used by biological scientists.
  • Demonstrate an understanding and application of the self-correcting nature of science.
  • At an emerging level, use quantitative reasoning to interpret patterns in the living world.
  • Communicate informed positions on biological issues, using appropriate biological vocabulary.

BI 102 : Biology

Presents protein synthesis, cell division, genetics, reproduction and development, and evolution. Designed as a laboratory science course for non-biology majors. The second course of a three-course sequence.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students will be able to:

  • Apply the scientific method to topics including genetics, evolution and reproduction.
  • Gather and organize information on current issues in genetics, evolution and reproduction, assess its validity, and differentiate factual information from
  • opinion and pseudoscience.
  • Apply concepts of genetics, evolution, and reproduction to novel problems, discern their meaning, and communicate their understanding to others.
  • Develop informed positions or opinions of a responsible citizen on contemporary issues in genetics, evolution and reproduction.
  • Apply course concepts in genetics, evolution and reproduction to their lives (personal and career) and to the world about them.

BI 103 : Biology

Presents the evolutionary relationships among the kingdoms. Includes a comparison of biological systems across kingdoms. Designed as a laboratory science course for non-biology majors.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students will be able to:

  • Use classification and evolutionary relationships among taxa to identify strategies that organisms employ to sustain life.
  • Communicate an understanding of biodiversity and conservation and its value to the student, to our society, and to the natural environment.
  • Gather and apply knowledge of form and function to qualitatively and quantitatively explain how organisms live.
  • Use laboratory experiences comparing species characteristics to organize an understanding of evolutionary relationships.
  • Appreciate aesthetic value of living organisms in the natural world.
  • Use scientific knowledge of body systems to critically evaluate experimental outcomes and apply them to human health and the environment.

BI 112 : Cell Biology for Health Occupations

Includes the study of the scientific method, cellular chemistry, cell structure and function, principles of inheritance, and laboratory skills. Includes topics and skills required to continue to anatomy and physiology and microbiology.

Credits

5

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted. Either MTH 65 OR MTH 98 is accepted.

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

  •  Use scientific vocabulary and apply the scientific method to critically evaluate current health issues in our society.
  • Recall biological and chemical principles of cell function and apply that knowledge to health science topics. 
  • Build on the laboratory research experience to organize data and information in order to draw conclusions and identify new investigative paths.

BI 141 : Habitats: Life of the Forest

Examines structure and function of Oregon forest ecosystems. Covers distribution and interactions of plants, animals, microorganisms, climate and basic geology. Laboratory emphasizes identification and environmental testing.

Fieldwork Statement

Fieldwork is a professional competence in many areas of Biology. Standard field practices include measurements of abiotic and biotic components. Fieldwork includes use of all the senses to make observations in natural and built environments. Field training may include developing skills in site characterization, measurement and data collection, application of key terms and concepts, species identification, and observation. Certain protocols may require use of equipment, chemicals, and expensive gear. Field training is experiential often leading to unique sets of observations/data in particular locations. Fieldwork may include inherent risks (uneven terrain, off-trail work with map & compass, variable weather, insects, environmental irritants, travel, stress, etc.). Fieldwork can be physically challenging and may require overland travel on foot or unusual means to field points, carrying field equipment (as well as food, water, and safety equipment), taking measurements under duress (learning new protocols, requiring remaining in an unusual posture or position for a length of time, timing pressures for certain procedures, holding organisms, variable weather, etc.), survival skills, orienteering, and so on.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

A student will collaboratively and independently:

  • Use basic principles of ecosystems structure and function to characterize a specific forest.
  • Identify and express how humans interact with the forest environment by applying basic principles of forest management.
  • Work with a team to initialize and complete a study of the biology, chemistry and physical characteristics of a forest.

BI 142 : Habitats: Marine Biology

Examines marine environment and the ecology, physiology, and morphology of marine plants and animals, emphasizing Oregon. Laboratory focuses on identification and environmental testing.

Fieldwork Statement

Fieldwork is a professional competence in many areas of Biology. Standard field practices include measurements of abiotic and biotic components. Fieldwork includes use of all the senses to make observations in natural and built environments. Field training may include developing skills in site characterization, measurement and data collection, application of key terms and concepts, species identification, and observation. Certain protocols may require use of equipment, chemicals, and expensive gear. Field training is experiential often leading to unique sets of observations/data in particular locations. Fieldwork may include inherent risks (uneven terrain, off-trail work with map & compass, variable weather, insects, environmental irritants, travel, stress, etc.). Fieldwork can be physically challenging and may require overland travel on foot or unusual means to field points, carrying field equipment (as well as food, water, and safety equipment), taking measurements under duress (learning new protocols, requiring remaining in an unusual posture or position for a length of time, timing pressures for certain procedures, holding organisms, variable weather, etc.), survival skills, orienteering, and so on.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

A student will collaboratively and independently:

  • Use basic ecosystem principles, identify and understand the biology of various marine phyla to characterize marine habitats.
  • Use scientific techniques to quantitatively describe parameters of marine habitats and understand the relationship of physical parameters to distribution of biota.
  • Use an understanding of research, laboratory and/or field experiences to organize data to illustrate and articulate basic ecological principles.
  • Use critical thinking to evaluate human impacts on marine ecosystems and consider how local consumer and policy decisions can be informed by an understanding of the interconnectedness of marine habitats and the critical relationship of the sea to human cultures.

BI 143 : Habitats: Fresh Water Biology

Covers environments of freshwater streams, lakes, and marshes. Includes effects of physical and chemical factors on organisms, along with the organisms, their biological interactions and nutrient cycles. Explores ecological factors of freshwater environments and the effects of human activities on them.

Fieldwork Statement

Fieldwork is a professional competence in many areas of Biology. Standard field practices include measurements of abiotic and biotic components. Fieldwork includes use of all the senses to make observations in natural and built environments. Field training may include developing skills in site characterization, measurement and data collection, application of key terms and concepts, species identification, and observation. Certain protocols may require use of equipment, chemicals, and expensive gear. Field training is experiential often leading to unique sets of observations/data in particular locations. Fieldwork may include inherent risks (uneven terrain, off-trail work with map & compass, variable weather, insects, environmental irritants, travel, stress, etc.). Fieldwork can be physically challenging and may require overland travel on foot or unusual means to field points, carrying field equipment (as well as food, water, and safety equipment), taking measurements under duress (learning new protocols, requiring remaining in an unusual posture or position for a length of time, timing pressures for certain procedures, holding organisms, variable weather, etc.), survival skills, orienteering, and so on.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

A student will collaboratively and independently:

  • Use basic principles of ecosystems structure and function to characterize freshwater habitats.
  • Identify and express how humans interact with the freshwater ecosystems by applying basic principles of environmental management.
  • Identify and understand the biology of the various freshwater phyla.

BI 211 : Principles of Biology

Includes introduction to science, biochemistry, metabolism, the cell, molecular biology, and reproduction. The first course of a three-course sequence for students majoring in biology and the sciences, including premedical, pre-dental, chiropractic, pharmacy, and related fields. Recommended: High school biology and chemistry within the past seven years.

Credits

5

Prerequisites

CH 151 or higher can be either a prerequisite or corequisite, or the student can pass the Chemistry 151 competency exam or get instructor permission. MTH 95 or higher.

Corequisites

Students will be able to:

  • Apply biological theories and concepts from biochemistry and cell biology to novel problems in their lives and community (personal, work, and career).
  • Use the scientific method, including experimental design, data collection, and presentations of results and conclusions while analyzing their individual thinking and learning styles and how their styles can be integrated with methods used in science.
  • Assess the strengths and weaknesses of scientific studies in biochemistry and cell biology and critically examine the influence of scientific and technical knowledge of biochemistry and cell biology on human society and the environment.
  • Develop informed positions and opinions on contemporary issues in biochemistry and cell biology, while considering ethical, scientific, community, and cultural implications.
  • Communicate concepts in biochemistry and cell biology using appropriate terminology in both written and verbal forms.
  • Competently enter and complete further work in the sciences, including Biology 212 and upper level courses in biochemistry and cell biology.

BI 212 : Principles of Biology

Includes inheritance, the genetic code, modern and classical genetics, evolution, diversity, and systematics. May include some dissection of plants and animals. The second course in a three-course sequence for students majoring in biology and the sciences, including pre-medical, pre-dental, chiropractic, pharmacy, and related fields.

Credits

5

Prerequisites

BI 112 or BI 211 accepted as prerequisite for course.

Students will be able to:

  • apply biological theories and concepts to novel problems in genetics, evolution, and systematics;
  • assess the strengths and weaknesses of scientific studies in genetics, evolution, and systematics and critically examine the influence of scientific and technical knowledge of genetics, evolution, and systematics on human society and the environment.
  • apply concepts from genetics, evolution, and systematics to their lives and community (personal, work, and career);
  • develop informed positions and opinions on contemporary issues in genetics, evolution, and systematics, while considering ethical, scientific, community, and cultural implications;
  • communicate concepts in genetics, evolution, and systematics using appropriate terminology in both written and verbal forms.
  • competently enter and complete further work in the sciences, including Biology 213 and upperlevel courses in genetics, evolution, and systematics.

BI 213 : Principles of Biology

Includes plant and animal anatomy and physiology, and individual, population, community and ecosystem ecology. The third course of a three-course sequence for students majoring in biology and the sciences, including pre-medical, pre-dental, chiropractic, pharmacy, and related fields.

Credits

5

Prerequisites

Upon successful completion students will be able to:

  • apply biological theories and concepts to novel problems in plant/animal anatomy and physiology and ecology;
  • assess the strengths and weaknesses of scientific studies in plant/animal anatomy and physiology and ecology and critically examine the influence of scientific and technical knowledge of plant/animal anatomy and physiology and ecology on human society and the environment.
  • apply concepts from plant/animal anatomy and physiology and ecology to their lives and community (personal, work, and career);
  • develop informed positions and opinions on contemporary issues in plant/animal anatomy and physiology and ecology, while considering ethical, scientific, community, and cultural implications;
  • communicate concepts in plant/animal anatomy and physiology and ecology using appropriate terminology in both written and verbal forms.
  • competently enter and complete further work in the sciences upper-level courses in plant/animal anatomy and physiology and ecology.

BI 231 : Human Anatomy & Physiology I

Introduces basic anatomical and physiological terms, tissues, the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems including nervous histology, physiology, spinal cord and nerves. Includes lecture discussions complemented by laboratories involving microscopy, animal dissection, physiological exercises and computer based exercises. This is the first course in a three-course sequence.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted. BI 112 or (BI 211 and BI 212) may be accepted.

Upon successful completion students will be able to:

  • Work collaboratively, competently and ethically within a team of other health care professionals in subsequent clinical and academic programs in allied health sciences.
  • Apply concepts and knowledge of general anatomical terminology, gross anatomy, physiology, histology and terminology related to the integument, muscular, skeletal and nervous systems (histology, physiology, spinal cord and nerves) toward clinical problem solving.
  • Critically evaluate health articles and medical journals related to anatomy and physiology and contextualize the knowledge into the realm of public health and broader social issues.
  • Effectively evaluate case studies in anatomy and physiology through verbal, written and/or multimedia means.
  • Continually develop scientific reasoning and the ability to interpret patient data through the collection of clinical and physiological parameters.
  • Use correct terminology to communicate anatomical features and physiological processes.

BI 232 : Human Anatomy & Physiology II

Continues the study of the nervous system, including brain, cranial nerves, and autonomic nervous system. Introduces the endocrine, cardiovascular and immune systems. Includes lecture discussions complemented by laboratories involving microscopy, animal dissection, physiological exercises and computer based exercises. This is the second course in a three-course sequence.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Upon successful completion students will be able to:

  • Work collaboratively, competently and ethically within a team of other health care professionals in subsequent clinical and academic programs in allied health sciences.
  • Apply concepts and knowledge of  terminology related to the nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular and immune systems toward clinical problem solving.
  • Critically evaluate health articles and medical journals related to anatomy and physiology and contextualize the knowledge into the realm of public health and broader social issues.
  • Effectively evaluate case studies in anatomy and physiology through verbal, written and/or multimedia means.
  • Continually develop scientific reasoning and the ability to interpret patient data through the collection of clinical and physiological parameters.
  • Use correct terminology to communicate anatomical features and physiological processes.

BI 233 : Human Anatomy & Physiology III

Introduces the respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems, metabolism and fluid and electrolyte balances, embryology and genetics. Includes lecture discussions complemented by laboratories involving microscopy, animal dissection, physiological exercises and computer based exercises. Concludes a three-course sequence.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Upon successful completion students will be able to:

  • Work collaboratively, competently and ethically within a team of other health care professionals in subsequent clinical and academic programs in allied health sciences.
  • Apply concepts and knowledge of general terminology, gross anatomy, physiology, histology and terminology related to the respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems, metabolism and fluid and electrolyte balances; embryology and genetics toward clinical problem solving.
  • Critically evaluate health articles and medical journals related to anatomy and physiology and contextualize the knowledge into the realm of public health and broader social issues.
  • Effectively evaluate case studies in anatomy and physiology through verbal, written and/or multimedia means.
  • Continually develop scientific reasoning and the ability to interpret patient data through the collection of clinical and physiological parameters.
  • Use correct terminology to communicate anatomical features and physiological processes.

BI 234 : Microbiology

Lecture, recitation, and laboratory cover: bacterial identification, morphology, metabolism and genetics; bacterial, viral, and parasitic relationships with human health and disease; and basic immunology. Laboratory stresses aseptic technique, bacterial identification and physiology using a variety of media, culturing techniques, and staining techniques.

Credits

5

Prerequisites

BI 112 or (BI 211 and BI 212) may be accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Relate an understanding of the basic principles of microbiology to personal health and use this understanding to make informed personal and professional decisions.
  • Use an understanding of the impact of microbes on human cultures around the world both historically and in the present day to evaluate current social health issues.
  • Use scientific methods to quantitatively describe microbial characteristics and processes and understand their relationship to the identification of microbial species.
  • Use an understanding of research and laboratory experiences to organize, evaluate, and present data and information to illustrate and articulate basic microbiology concepts.

BI 298 : Independent Study

Provides an opportunity for students to work independently on an advanced individualized area of study within biology under the sponsorship and guidance of a biology faculty member.

Fieldwork Statement

Fieldwork is a professional competence in many areas of Biology. Standard field practices include measurements of abiotic and biotic components. Fieldwork includes use of all the senses to make observations in natural and built environments. Field training may include developing skills in site characterization, measurement and data collection, application of key terms and concepts, species identification, and observation. Certain protocols may require use of equipment, chemicals, and expensive gear. Field training is experiential often leading to unique sets of observations/data in particular locations. Fieldwork may include inherent risks (uneven terrain, off-trail work with map & compass, variable weather, insects, environmental irritants, travel, stress, etc.). Fieldwork can be physically challenging and may require overland travel on foot or unusual means to field points, carrying field equipment (as well as food, water, and safety equipment), taking measurements under duress (learning new protocols, requiring remaining in an unusual posture or position for a length of time, timing pressures for certain procedures, holding organisms, variable weather, etc.), survival skills, orienteering, and so on.

Credits

1 - 4

Prerequisites

Instructor permission required.

  • Meet the outcomes mutually agreed upon by the student and instructor for this independent study course that expand upon topics covered in previous biology courses taken.
  • Successfully transfer and perform at a four-year college or university or other program of interest to the student.
  • Apply the scientific method and biological concepts in novel settings for lifelong learning.