Mathematics

Classes

MTH 20 : Fundamentals of Mathematics

Develops arithmetic fluency and the conceptual basis, and applications of integers, fractions, decimals, percents, and measurements. A scientific calculator may be required. The TI-30XS or TI-30XIIS is recommended. It's recommended that students take MTH courses in consecutive terms.

Credits

4

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

  • Perform accurate arithmetic computations in a variety of expressions and applications.
  • Apply mathematical problem solving strategies.
  • Effectively communicate mathematical reasoning.

MTH 30 : Business Mathematics

Applies arithmetic to a variety of problems found in the business field, including simple and compound interest, annuities, payroll preparation, pricing, invoice preparation, trade discounts, taxes, and depreciation. Scientific calculator required.

This course is intended to prepare students to use basic mathematics in solving monetary problems in business and personal finance.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion, students should be able to:

  • Analyze real world scenarios to recognize when simple and compound interest, annuities, payroll preparation, pricing, invoice preparation, trade discounts, taxes, and depreciation are appropriate, formulate problems about the scenarios, creatively model these scenarios (using technology if appropriate) in order to solve the problems using multiple approaches, judge if the results are reasonable, and then interpret and clearly communicate the results.
  • Appreciate business mathematics concepts that are encountered in the real world, understand and be able to communicate the underlying business concepts and mathematics involved to help another person gain insight into the situation.
  • Work with simple and compound interest, annuities, payroll preparation, pricing, invoice preparation, trade discounts, taxes, and depreciation problems in various situations and use correct mathematical terminology, notation, and symbolic processes in order to be prepared for future coursework in business and mathematics that requires the use of and an understanding of the concepts of business mathematics.

MTH 58 : Math Literacy I

Introduces pattern recognition, estimation and number sense, working with units, spreadsheets, linear equations and inequalities. Explores how to clearly communicate arguments supported by quantitative evidence using words, tables, graphs, and mathematical equations. Supports collaborative learning through class group interaction. TI-83 or TI-84 calculator required.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon completion of the course students should be able to

  • Make accurate inferences and conclusions based upon data presented in graphical or tabular format.
  • Demonstrate how units are used in measurement and in calculation.
  • Recognize linear and non-linear patterns.
  • Derive, solve, and model with linear equations and inequalities in one variable.
  • Estimate values based upon data presented in numerical, tabular and graphical form.

MTH 60 : Introductory Algebra - First Term

Introduces algebraic concepts and processes with a focus on linear equations, linear inequalities, and systems of linear equations. Emphasizes number-sense, applications, graphs, formulas, and proper mathematical notation.

A scientific calculator and access to a graphing utility may be required.

Students are no longer required to have physical graphing calculators in MTH 60, 65, 70, 95, 111, and 112. Where physically possible, instructors will demonstrate using Desmos, GeoGebra, or other online programs in class. Assessments requiring the use of a graphing utility may be done outside of proctored exams.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

  • Identify the differences between an expression and an equation.
  • Simplify and evaluate algebraic expressions.
  • Solve linear equations and inequalities in one variable, and linear systems in two variables.
  • Identify and interpret the slope as a rate of change in linear relationships.
  • Create linear equations, inequalities, and systems that model contextual situations and use the model to make predictions.
  • Represent linear relationships between two variables using a graph, table, verbal description, and algebraic formula.

MTH 65 : Introductory Algebra - Second Term

Introduces algebraic concepts and processes with a focus on polynomials, exponents, roots, geometry, dimensional analysis, solving quadratic equations, and graphing parabolas. Emphasizes number-sense, applications, graphs, formulas, and proper mathematical notation.

A scientific calculator and access to a graphing utility may be required.

Students are no longer required to have physical graphing calculators in MTH 60, 65, 70, 95, 111, and 112. Where physically possible instructors will demonstrate using Desmos, GeoGebra, or other online programs in class. Assessments requiring the use of a graphing utility may be done outside of proctored exams.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

  • Recognize and apply the operations necessary to simplify expressions and solve equations.
  • Perform polynomial addition, subtraction, and multiplication and perform polynomial division by a monomial.
  • Use exponent and radical properties to simplify expressions and solve radical and quadratic equations.
  • Distinguish among perimeter, area, and volume and apply the formulas and appropriate units in contextual situations.
  • Perform unit conversions.
  • Distinguish between quadratic and linear relationships in symbolic, graphical, and verbal forms.
  • Create quadratic models, make predictions, and interpret the meaning of intercepts, vertices, and maximum or minimum values.

MTH 95 : Intermediate Algebra

Introduces algebraic concepts and processes with a focus on factoring, functions, rational expressions, solving equations (quadratic, rational, radical, absolute value), and solving inequalities. Emphasizes number-sense, applications, graphs, formulas, and proper mathematical notation.

Access to a graphing utility will be required and a scientific calculator may be required.

Students are no longer required to have physical graphing calculators in MTH 60, 65, 70, 95, 111, or 112. Where physically possible instructors will demonstrate using Desmos, GeoGebra, or other online programs in class. Assessments requiring the use of a graphing utility may be done outside of the proctored exams.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Or placement into WR 115 also accepted. Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

  • Factor expressions and use factoring to simplify rational expressions and solve quadratic equations.
  • Solve absolute value, quadratic, rational, radical equations, and compound inequalities both symbolically and graphically.
  • Understand the definition of a function and use it to distinguish between function and non-function relationships.
  • Interpret information provided in function notation given a function expressed in graphical, symbolic, numeric, or verbal form.
  • Use variables to represent unknown quantities, create a function to model a situation, and use algebra and/or technology to find and interpret a result.
  • Interpret properties of functions and relations, such as the meaning of ordered pairs, domain and range, maximum and minimum values, and intercepts.

MTH 98 : Math Literacy II

Introduces normal distribution and regression/curve fitting. Covers modeling, graphing and solving of linear and quadratic equations. Introduces problem solving with linear systems of equations. Explores how to clearly communicate sophisticated arguments supported by quantitative evidence using spreadsheets, words, tables, graphs, and mathematical equations, as appropriate. Supports collaborative learning through class group interaction. TI-83 or TI-84 calculator required.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted. MTH 58 or MTH 65 accepted.

Upon completion of the course students should be able to

  • Use a graphing calculator and an Excel style spreadsheet system to perform calculations and create graphical displays.

  • Make reasonable conclusions based upon data or situations modeled by a normal distribution.

  • Construct, model and problem solve with linear and non-linear functions.

  • Apply an understanding of functions and function notation.

  • Recognize the difference between direct and indirect variation.

MTH 105 : Math in Society

Explores concepts and applications of logic rules, basic probability and statistics as well as personal finance models. Investigates problem solving techniques (algebraic and nonalgebraic) as well as some nontraditional mathematics topics such as social choice or discrete mathematics. Integrates technology where appropriate.

It's recommended that students take MTH courses in consecutive terms.

Math in Society is a rigorous mathematics course designed for students in Liberal Arts and Humanities majors.  The course provides a solid foundation in quantitative reasoning, symbolic reasoning, and problem solving techniques needed to be a productive, contributing citizen in the 21st century.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted. MTH 95 or MTH 98 accepted.

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

  • Use formulas and perform relevant calculations pertaining to personal finance in order to make informed financial decisions
  • Make and interpret calculations and graphical displays of numerical data in order to perceive and infer patterns within data sets
  • Calculate and interpret theoretical and empirical probabilities in support of making predictions and decisions in the presence of uncertainty
  • Use logical reasoning to describe and critique arguments and recognize common logical fallacies
  • Support conclusions using logical thought, reflection, explanation and justification
  • Use appropriate representations to effectively communicate, orally and in writing, quantitative results and mathematical processes

MTH 111 : College Algebra

Explores relations and functions graphically, numerically, symbolically, and verbally. Examines exponential, logarithmic, polynomial, and rational functions. Investigates applications from a variety of perspectives. Graphing technology is required, such as Desmos and/or GeoGebra which are available at no cost. It's recommended that students take MTH courses in consecutive terms.

Students are no longer required to have physical graphing calculators in either MTH 95 or MTH 111. Where physically possible instructors will demonstrate using Desmos, GeoGebra, or other online programs in class. Assessments requiring the use of a graphing calculator will be done outside of the proctored exam grade component.

Credits

5

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of functions including function notation, function algebra, domain/range, inverse functions, piecewise functions, graph transformations, and symmetry. 
  • Analyze polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions represented numerically, symbolically, verbally and graphically and identify properties of these functions using technology.
  • Use variables to represent unknown quantities; create models; solve exponential, logarithmic, polynomial, and rational equations; and interpret the results.
  • Demonstrate a mastery of the skills necessary for future course work that requires the use of college algebra concepts.

MTH 112 : Elementary Functions

Investigates trigonometric functions, equations and identities. Examines right and oblique triangles, vectors, polar coordinates, parametric equations, and complex numbers. Explores topics graphically, numerically, symbolically, and verbally. Graphing technology is required, such as Desmos and/or GeoGebra which are available at no cost. It's recommended that students take MTH courses in consecutive terms.

Students are no longer required to have physical graphing calculators in MTH 112.

Where physically possible instructors will demonstrate using Desmos, GeoGebra, or other online programs in class. Assessments requiring the use of a graphing calculator will be done outside of the proctored exam grade component.

Credits

5

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate mastery-level understanding of angles and right triangle trigonometry in various systems of measure. 
  • Analyze periodic functions and perform graph transformations on trigonometric functions.
  • Use variables to represent unknown quantities; create models; solve trigonometric equations and interpret the results.
  • Integrate pre-requisite skills to verify trigonometric identities and simplify trigonometric expressions.
  • Analyze the graphs of trigonometric functions, the graphs of functions defined on the polar coordinate system, the graphs of parametric equations, and complex numbers, using technology when appropriate.
  • Demonstrate mastery of skills necessary for future course work that requires an understanding of trigonometric functions and identities, vector arithmetic, complex numbers, the polar coordinate system, or parametric equations.

MTH 211 : Foundations of Elementary Math I

Examines the conceptual basis of K-8 mathematics using collaborative learning through in-class group interaction. Provides opportunities to experience using manipulatives to model problem solving, numeration systems, operations, patterns and change, and number theory. Emphasizes quantitative and algebraic reasoning. Includes content and mathematical practices based on the Common Core State Standards.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Apply an understanding of the theoretical foundations of mathematics focusing on numeration systems and operations as taught at the K-8 level in order to develop mathematical knowledge and communication skills necessary for teaching.
  • Use various problem solving strategies and algebraic reasoning to create mathematical models, analyze real world scenarios, judge if the results are reasonable, and then interpret and clearly communicate the results.
  • Use appropriate mathematics, including correct mathematical terminology, notation, and symbolic processes, and use technology to explore the foundations of elementary mathematics.
  • Foster the mathematical practices in the Common Core State Standards.

MTH 212 : Foundations of Elementary Math II

Examines the conceptual basis of K-8 mathematics using collaborative learning through in-class group interaction. Provides opportunities to experience using manipulatives to model operations with rational numbers including fractions, decimals, percents, and integers. Explores the set of irrational numbers, the set of real numbers, proportional reasoning, and simple probability and statistics. Includes content and mathematical practices based on the Common Core State Standards.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Apply an understanding of the theoretical foundations of mathematics focusing on real number operations, probability, and statistics as taught at the K-8 level in order to develop mathematical knowledge and communication skills necessary for teaching.
  • Use various problem solving strategies and statistical reasoning to create mathematical models, analyze real world scenarios, judge if the results are reasonable, and then interpret and clearly communicate the results.
  • Use appropriate mathematics, including correct mathematical terminology, notation, and symbolic processes, and use technology to explore the foundations of elementary mathematics.
  • Foster the mathematical practices in the Common Core State Standards.

MTH 213 : Foundations of Elementary Math III

Examines the conceptual basis of K-8 mathematics using collaborative learning through in-class group interaction. Provides opportunities to experience using manipulatives to model problem solving, explore patterns and relationships among geometric figures and develop spatial reasoning. Explores informal geometry, transformational geometry, and measurement systems. Includes content and mathematical practices based on the Common Core State Standards.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

  • Apply an understanding of theoretical foundations of mathematics focusing on geometric principles as taught at the K-8 level in order to develop mathematical knowledge and communication skills necessary for teaching.
  • Use various problem solving strategies and geometrical reasoning to create mathematical models, analyze real world scenarios, judge if the results are reasonable, and then interpret and clearly communicate the results.
  • Use appropriate mathematics, including correct mathematical terminology, notation, and symbolic processes, and use technology to explore the foundations of elementary mathematics.
  • Foster the mathematical practices in the Common Core State Standards.

MTH 243 : Statistics I

Introduces displaying data with graphs, numerical descriptions of data, producing data, elementary probability, probability distributions, confidence intervals and significance testing. Investigates applications from science, business, and social science perspectives. Graphing calculator with advanced statistical programs and/or computer software required; see instructor.

This is the first term of a two-term sequence (MTH 243 and 244) that is intended to provide an introduction to statistics in a data-based setting.

Credits

5

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

  • Identify statistical results and terminology in politics, popular culture, and scientific studies and state their relevance.
  • Use statistical thinking to identify, answer and interpret meaningful questions.
  • Generate appropriate graphical and numerical summaries for various situations.
  • Describe and identify the role and importance of variability and randomness in statistics.
  • Use statistical models (single and multivariable) and statistical inference (hypothesis testing and confidence intervals) in a range of contextual settings and draw appropriate conclusions.
  • Use statistical software to analyze data, carry out inference and make conclusions.
  • Be prepared to continue a course of study in a major field that requires the use and understanding of the concepts and logical implications of probability and statistics.

MTH 244 : Statistics II

Includes confidence interval estimation; tests of significance including z-tests, t-tests, ANOVA, and chi-square; and inference for linear regression. Investigates applications from science, business, and social science perspectives. Graphing calculator with advanced statistical programs and/or computer software required; see instructor.

This is the second term of a two-term sequence (MTH 243 and MTH 244).  This course is intended to provide an introduction to statistics in a data-based setting.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion, students should be able to:

  • Critically analyze the data from observational studies, surveys, and experiments, and using appropriate statistical methods and technology, judge if the results are reasonable, and then interpret and clearly communicate the results.
  •  Interpret studies in scholarly and scientific publications and make sense of statistical information provided by the media.
  • Understand and be able to communicate the underlying mathematics involved to help another person gain insight into probability and statistics concepts encountered in real world situations.
  • Reason from data and use standard mathematical terminology, notation, and symbolic processes in order to engage in work, study, and other applications that require the use of and an understanding of the concepts of statistics in a data-based setting.

MTH 251 : Calculus I

Includes limits, continuity, derivatives and some applications of derivatives. Graphing technology is required, such as Desmos and/or GeoGebra which are available at no cost.

This is the first course of four courses in the Calculus sequence. Lab time shall be used by students to work on group activities.

Effective Spring 2018, students will no longer be required to have physical graphing calculators in MTH 251. Where physically possible instructors will demonstrate using Desmos, GeoGebra, or other online programs in class. Assessments requiring the use of a graphing calculator will be done outside of the proctored exam grade component.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

  • Analyze real world scenarios to recognize when derivatives and limits are appropriate, formulate problems about the scenarios, creatively model these scenarios (using technology, if appropriate) in order to solve the problems using multiple approaches, judge if the results are reasonable, and then interpret and clearly communicate the results.
  • Recognize derivatives and limit-related concepts that are encountered in the real world; understand and be able to communicate the underlying mathematics involved to help another person gain insight into the situation.
  • Work with derivatives and limits in various situations and use correct mathematical terminology, notation, and symbolic processes in order to engage in work, study, and conversation on topics involving derivatives and limits with colleagues in the field of mathematics, science or engineering.

MTH 252 : Calculus II

Includes antiderivatives, the definite integral, topics of integration, improper integrals, and applications of differentiation and integration. Graphing technology is required, such as Desmos and/or GeoGebra which are available at no cost.

This class is a foundational course for many STEM majors. Some topics are of particular importance for students continuing into MTH 253 including: using L’Hospital’s rule to evaluate limits, improper integrals, and error estimates for definite integrals. Students may be taking this course concurrently with calculus based physics courses. It can be beneficial for these students if the integral symbol is introduced early on to represent anti-derivatives.  Partial fractions are a particularly important technique for engineering students (which will be revisited in MTH 253 and MTH 256). Students should be able to do simple partial fraction expansions by hand, but may use the “expand” command on their CAS for more complicated problems. Because this course is also a pre-requisite for MTH 261, logic and correct application of theorems should be emphasized.

Lab time shall be used by students to work on group activities.

Effective Summer 2018, students will no longer be required to have physical graphing calculators in MTH 252. Where physically possible instructors will demonstrate using Desmos, GeoGebra, or other online programs in class. Assessments requiring the use of a graphing calculator will be done outside of the proctored exam grade component.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

MTH 253 : Calculus III

Includes infinite sequences and series (including Taylor series), vectors, and geometry of space. Graphing calculator required. TI-89 Titanium or Casio Classpad 330 recommended.

This is the third course of four courses in the Calculus sequence.

Credits

5

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon completion of the course the students should be able to:

  • Analyze real world scenarios to recognize when series, vectors, and geometry of space are appropriate, formulate problems about the scenarios, creatively model these scenarios (using technology, if appropriate) in order to solve the problems using multiple approaches, judge if the results are reasonable, and then interpret and clearly communicate the results.
  • Recognize  series,  vectors, and geometry of space concepts that are encountered in the real world; understand and be able to communicate the underlying mathematics involved to help another person gain insight into the situation.
  • Work with  series,  vectors, and geometry of space in various situations and use correct mathematical terminology, notation, and symbolic processes in order to engage in work, study, and conversation on topics involving vectors and series with colleagues in the field of mathematics, science or engineering.