Music

Classes

MUS 101 : Introduction to Music (Basic Materials)

Introduces the basic components of music such as rhythm, melody, harmony and structure. Includes basic note reading and building of music literacy skills. No prior music experience required.

Credits

3
  • Use basic music literacy in order to apply musical skills in the form of singing and/or learning to play a musical instrument.
  • Listen critically using the building blocks of music in order to identify structure and form in music.
  • Use the basic components of music in order to identify what makes up diverse musical style and genre.

MUS 105 : Music Appreciation

Provides an introduction to understanding symphonic music in the vocal and instrumental genres from the ancient period through the contemporary music of our time. Class will be presented using a multi-media format.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Appreciate the western music tradition, and enjoy a life enriched by the exposure to and the understanding of personal and cultural achievement.
  • Experience musical works "dynamically," that is, to appreciate simultaneously the uniqueness of a work, its origins and precedent, its potential as an influence and inspiration on other works, and its relationship to a particular cultural moment.
  • Generalize course content to other music not covered in the course so that one can understand and value a broad spectrum of musical expression.

MUS 108 : Music Cultures of the World

Examines musical cultures throughout the world with attention to cultural contexts and musical styles, including but not limited to Africa, the Americas, Asia, Near East, Europe and the South Pacific.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Overcome ethnocentrism through awareness about diverse peoples cultural communities and traditions. Use the social, political, and cultural contexts for different musical practices to gain a better awareness about their own cultural heritage and develop understanding and empathy for others.
  • Relate music to history, society, culture, and the individual while incorporating intellectual concepts, material resources and listening skills to appreciate and analyze diverse music from a global intercultural perspective.
  • Gain an understanding of the relationship of music to history, society, culture, and the individual while learning about intellectual concepts, material resources and listening skills necessary to appreciate and analyze diverse music from a global intercultural perspective.
  • Experience music "dynamically," that is, to appreciate simultaneously the uniqueness and value of each culture and its music through particular cultural moments, origins, precedents and potential in relationship to and inspiration upon other musics.
  • Appreciate the artistic, social, historical, and cultural contexts of world music through observation and critique to become an informed listener.
  • Generalize course content to other cultural expressions (including but not limited to music and genres not covered in the course) so that one can understand and value a broad spectrum of cultural expressions within diverse cultural settings.

MUS 110 : Fundamentals of Music

Covers the basic concepts of music: pitch, rhythm, meter, intervals, modes, scales, harmony and music notation. Introduces the science of sound and music theory terminology. Begins development of musical performance skills through singing, clapping and performance on the piano keyboard. Also includes basic aural skills. Course intended for non-music majors and to prepare students for further music theory study.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

  • Begin the formal study of music theory as it is applied in the music of the Western World.
  • Use learned applied keyboard, rhythm and singing skills in order to build the foundations of musicianship.
  • Listen critically using the building blocks of music in order to better understand the diverse musical styles of the world and what makes the music of each culture unique.

MUS 111 : Music Theory I (part one)

Covers music theory as exhibited in the works of the great composers of the 17th and 18th centuries. Includes notation, pitch, meter, tonality, modality, harmony and diatonic function. Basic music analysis focusing on harmonic function and figured bass notation. Includes written composition. Part one of three-term sequence.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Corequisites

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Exhibit developing musicianship (good tone production, stylistically proper phrasing, execution of dynamics and articulations) by beginning the application of the components of music theory through musical expression.
  • Attain musical literacy in order to consciously observe the musical practices of the masterworks of the western world through listening, harmonic analysis and basic music composition in order to appreciate simultaneously the uniqueness of a work, its origins and precedent, its potential as an influence and inspiration on other works, and its relationship to a particular cultural moment.
  • Generalize listening experience to music that is not part of the western art music tradition so that he/she can understand and value the music of the peoples of the world in all-encompassing ways.
  • Develop a personal musical language in the composition of basic musical works

MUS 111C : Music Theory I: Sight Singing and Ear Training (part one)

Focuses on the development of skills related to the notation, performance and aural recognition of music. Includes meter, rhythm, diatonic melodies, triads, solfeggio, intervals, and harmonic function. Part one of three term sequence.

Credits

1

Corequisites

Material will primarily be presented in a lecture/lab format. Other educational methods will be used to enhance lectures. These will include use of recorded materials, internet sites and computer software.
A large amount of student to teacher contact should be achieved throughout the term in order to encourage and accomplish successful student development.

  • Students will be able to interpret and perform rhythmic notation in simple meters (beat division and longer).
  • Students will be able to interpret and perform rhythmic notation in compound meters (beat division and longer).
  • Students will be able to isolate and accurately notate rhythm of a musical example (beat division and longer).
  • Students will be able to apply solfege to conjunct diatonic melodies.
  • Students will be able to aurally identify scale degrees within major and minor scales.
  • Students will be able to sing diatonic intervals (m2-P5) at sight.
  • Students will be able to aurally identify diatonic harmonic intervals (m2-P5).
  • Students will be able to sing basic conjunct diatonic melodies at sight using solfege.
  • Students will be able to accurately notate diatonic conjunct melodies.
  • Students will be able to aurally identify major and minor scales.
  • Students will be able to aurally identify diatonic chord functions (primary functions in major and minor keys).
  • Students will be able to aurally detect errors (rhythm and pitch) in the notation of diatonic conjunct melodies.
  • Students will be able to aurally identify triad chord qualities (major and minor).
  • Students will be able to aurally identify nonharmonic tones within a musical example (passing and neighbor tones).

MUS 112 : Music Theory I (part two)

Continues work from MUS 111. Focuses on four-part harmony and common practice period voice leading. Includes figured bass realization, harmonic analysis and written composition. Part two of three-term sequence.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Corequisites

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Attain fluent musical language in order to consciously observe the musical practices of the masterworks of the western world through listening, harmonic analysis, basic music composition and the practicing of tonal counterpoint in order to appreciate simultaneously the uniqueness of
  • a work, its origins and precedent, its potential as an influence and inspiration on other works, and its relationship to a particular cultural moment.
  • Exhibit good musicianship (good tone production, stylistically proper phrasing, execution of dynamics and articulations) by applying components of music theory through musical expression.
  • Generalize listening experience to music that is not part of the western art music tradition so that he/she can understand and value the music of the peoples of the world in all-encompassing ways.
  • Develop a personal musical language in the composition of original musical works.

MUS 112C : Music Theory I: Sight Singing and Ear Training (part two)

Continues development of skills from MUS 111C. Includes harmonic implications in melody, complex rhythms, beat subdivisions and four-part harmony. Introduces melodic chromaticism, extended harmony and phrase relationships. Part two of three-term sequence.

Credits

1

Prerequisites

Corequisites

Material will primarily be presented in a lecture/lab format. Other educational methods will be used to enhance lectures. These will include use of recorded materials, internet sites and computer software.

A large amount of student to teacher contact should be achieved throughout the term in order to encourage and accomplish successful student development.

  • Students will be able to interpret and perform rhythmic notation in simple meters (beat subdivision and longer values).
  • Students will be able to interpret and perform rhythmic notation in compound meters (beat subdivision and longer values).
  • Students will be able to isolate and accurately notate rhythm of musical examples that include beat subdivisions.
  • Students will be able to apply solfege to disjunct diatonic melodies.
  • Students will be able to sing diatonic intervals (m2-P8) at sight.
  • Students will be able to aurally identify diatonic harmonic intervals (m2-P8).
  • Students will be able to sing basic disjunct diatonic melodies at sight using solfege.
  • Students will be able to accurately notate disjunct diatonic melodies upon hearing.
  • Students will be able to aurally identify chord function (diatonic functions).
  • Students will be able to aurally detect errors in notation of disjunct diatonic melodies from the music literature.
  • Students will be able to aurally identify triad chord qualities (major, minor, diminished and augmented).
  • Students will be able to aurally identify nonharmonic tones within a musical example (suspensions, anticipations and escape tones).
  • Students will be able to accurately identify the relationship between two musical phrases. (E.g. repetition vs. sequence)

MUS 113 : Music Theory I (part three)

Continues work from MUS 112. Introduction to chromatic harmony as exhibited through tonicization and harmonic modulation. Covers melodic structure and basic Schenkerian reduction technique. Also includes large-scale form and analysis and written composition. Meets arts and humanities sequence requirement for Associate of Arts Oregon Transfer degree. Part three of three-term sequence.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Corequisites

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Attain fluent musical language mastery in order to consciously observe musical form in the masterworks of the western world through listening, harmonic analysis and music composition in order to appreciate simultaneously the uniqueness of a work, its origins and precedent, its potential as an influence and inspiration on other works, and its relationship to a particular cultural moment.
  • Exhibit advanced musicianship (good tone production, stylistically proper phrasing, execution of dynamics and articulations) by applying components of music theory through musical expression.
  • Generalize listening experience to music that is not part of the western art music tradition so that he/she can understand and value the music of the peoples of the world in all-encompassing ways.
  • Acquire a personal musical language in the composition of original musical works.

MUS 113C : Music Theory I: Sight Singing and Ear Training (part three)

Continues development of skills learned in MUS 112C. Includes two-part melodic and rhythmic notation. Introduces secondary function and diatonic modulation. Part three of three-term sequence.

Credits

1

Prerequisites

Corequisites

Material will primarily be presented in a lecture/lab format. Other educational methods will be used to enhance lectures. These will include use of recorded materials, internet sites and computer software.
A large amount of student to teacher contact should be achieved throughout the term in order to encourage and accomplish successful student development.

  • Students will be able to interpret and perform complex rhythmic notation in simple meters (beat subdivision and longer values).
  • Students will be able to interpret and perform complex rhythmic notation in compound meters (beat subdivision and longer values).
  • Students will be able to isolate and accurately notate rhythm of two-part musical examples that include beat subdivisions.
  • Students will be able to apply solfege to chromatic melodies.
  • Students will be able to sing all intervals (m2-P8) at sight.
  • Students will be able to aurally identify all harmonic intervals (m2-P8).
  • Students will be able to sing basic chromatic melodies at sight using solfege.
  • Students will be able to accurately notate single-line chromatic melodies and two-part diatonic melodies upon hearing.
  • Students will be able to aurally identify chord function (diatonic and secondary functions).
  • Students will be able to aurally detect errors in notation of chromatic melodies from the music literature.
  • Students will be able to aurally identify seventh chord qualities.
  • Students will be able to accurately notate the outer voices of a four-part musical example.

MUS 191 : Class Guitar I

Group instruction in guitar. Covers traditional classical guitar technique. Focuses on note reading and basic music theory as applies to guitar. Topics include single line first position melodies, common arpeggio patterns and music in two or more parts. Includes both solo and ensemble performance. Attention given to history and repertoire of the guitar.

No previous experience required.

Credits

2
  • Students will be able to perform single line melodies and simple polyphonic pieces in the first position.
  • Students will be able to execute musical works using basic classical guitar technique.
  • Students will be able to recognize the basic components of music theory.
  • Students will begin to be able to identify the stylistic variations between musical genres.

MUS 191P : Class Piano I

Group instruction in piano performance. Intent of course is the development of piano proficiency skills. Focus given to basic keyboard technique, score reading and performance, sight-reading, harmonization, accompanying, and transposition. Designed for music majors but is available to all students.

No previous experience required.

This course is required for students who plan on majoring in music at a four-year institution and is strongly recommended for any student wishing to study music theory. The course is open to all students

Credits

2

The material for the course will be presented in a lecture/lab format. Instruction will take place in an electronic piano lab. The piano lab should facilitate practical examination. Students will be required to apply the material through music performance on the piano keyboard. Musical examples from a wide array of genres will be used to demonstrate the concepts covered. Lectures may be enhanced through the use of multimedia technologies.

  • Students will able to accurately perform the major and minor scales in all keys (one octave, separate hands)
  • Students will be able to accurately construct and perform the ancient church modes in all keys.
  • Students will be able to accurately construct and perform basic triad arpeggios (hand over hand, ascending and descending, diatonic and chromatic)
  • Students will be able to construct and accurately perform all inversions of basic triads.
  • Students will be able to construct and accurately perform pentascales built on each scale degree of the major and minor scales.
  • Students will be able to construct and accurately perform pentascales based on whole tone and chromatic scales.
  • Students will be able to identify the quality of triads built on any major or minor scale degree.
  • Students will be able to construct and perform chord progressions using the primary triads in all major and minor keys.
  • Students will be able to successfully harmonize a single-line melody using proper chord progression.
  • Students will be able to read and perform basic rhythms at sight.
  • Students will be able to read and perform basic (beginning level) piano compositions at sight.
  • Students will be able to accurately perform transpositions of five finger pieces.

MUS 192 : Class Guitar II

Group instruction in guitar. Continues material presented in Music 191. Topics include reading notes up to the fifth position, advanced left hand technique, chord structure, flamenco technique and music theory as it applies to the guitar. Includes both solo and ensemble performance. More in depth study of the historical origins of the guitar, the repertoire and its major players.

Credits

2

Prerequisites

Or knowledge of first position note reading.

  • Students will be able to perform single line melodies and intermediate polyphonic pieces up to the fifth position.
  • Students will be able to execute musical works using beginning to intermediate classical and flamenco guitar technique.
  • Students will be able to find solutions to idiomatic problems.
  • Students will be able to construct basic harmonies on the fretboard.
  • Students will be able to interpret intermediate level music notation.
  • Students will begin to be able to identify the stylistic variations between musical genres through the use of applied music theory.

MUS 192P : Class Piano II

Continues group instruction in piano performance covered in MUS 191p. Intent of course is the development of piano proficiency skills. Focus given to basic keyboard technique, score reading and performance, sight-reading, harmonization, accompanying, and transposition. Designed for music majors but is available to all students.

This course is required for students who plan on majoring in music at a four-year institution and is strongly recommended for any student wishing to pursue studies in music theory. The course is open to all students

Credits

2

Prerequisites

The material for the course will be presented in a lecture/lab format. Instruction will take place in an electronic piano lab. The piano lab should facilitate practical examination. Students will be required to apply the material through music performance on the the piano keyboard. Musical examples from a wide array of genres will be used to demonstrate the concepts covered. Lectures may be enhanced through the use of multimedia technologies.

  • Students will able to accurately perform major scales in all keys with prepared fingerings (separate hands, four octaves, ascending and descending)
  • Students will be able to accurately construct and perform seventh chord arpeggios (hand over hand, ascending and descending)
  • Students will be able to accurately interpret and perform triads and seventh chords using pop chord notation.
  • Students will be able to construct and perform chord progressions using the secondary and primary triads in all major and minor keys.
  • Students will be able to successfully harmonize a single-line melody using proper chord progression (including secondary harmonies).
  • Students will be able to accurately harmonize the major and minor scales.
  • Students will be able to accurately perform four-part, chorale style harmonizations.
  • Students will be able to provide harmonic analysis of chords as found in music.
  • Students will be able to accurately perform a basic (beginning to intermediate level) composition for treble and bass clef.
  • Students will be able to successfully transpose a basic piano composition to two new keys.
  • Students will be able to successfully perform a basic piano composition at sight.

MUS 193 : Class Guitar III

Group instruction in guitar. Continues material presented in Music 192. Topics include reading notes up to the twelfth position, alternate tunings, altered chords, creating original arrangements and music theory as it applies to the guitar. Includes both performing as a soloist and as a member of an ensemble. Detailed study of twentieth century guitar practice and the influence of popular styles.

Credits

2

Prerequisites

  • Students will be able to perform intermediate polyphonic pieces up to the twelfth position.
  • Students will be able to execute musical works using intermediate to advanced classical, flamenco and modern guitar techniques.
  • Students will be able to perform musical works in alternate tunings.
  • Students will be able to create original arrangements for performance on the guitar.
  • Students will be able to interpret intermediate to advanced level music notation.
  • Students will begin to be able to compose original works for the guitar.
  • Students will be able to identify common luthier practices.

MUS 193P : Class Piano III

Continues group instruction in piano performance covered in MUS 192p. Intent of course is the development of piano proficiency skills. Focus given to basic keyboard technique, score reading and performance, sight-reading, harmonization, accompanying, and transposition. Designed for music majors but available to all students.

This course is required for students who plan on majoring in music at a four-year institution and is strongly recommended for any student wishing to pursue studies in music theory. The course is open to all students

Credits

2

Prerequisites

The material for the course will be presented in a lecture/lab format. Instruction will take place in an electronic piano lab. The piano lab should facilitate practical examination. Students will be required to apply the material through music performance on the the piano keyboard. Musical examples from a wide array of genres will be used to demonstrate the concepts covered. Lectures may be enhanced through the use of multimedia technologies.

  • Students will be able to successfully apply basic keyboard fingering concepts to simple piano compositions.
  • Students will able to accurately perform major and parallel minor scales in all keys (separate hands, two octaves, ascending and descending).
  • Students will able to accurately perform major and minor tetra scales in all keys.
  • Students will be able to accurately perform seventh chord arpeggios (hand over hand, ascending and descending)
  • Students will be able to construct and perform seventh chords on all scale degrees of the major and harmonic minor scales.
  • Students will be able to successfully perform triads and seventh chords in blocked and broken forms.
  • Students will be able to accurately construct and perform harmonic progressions using diatonic seventh chords.
  • Students will be able to accurately harmonize single-line melody using secondary dominant chords.
  • Students will be able to accurately perform four-part, chorale style harmonizations using secondary dominant chords.
  • Students will be able to provide harmonic analysis of chords as found in music.
  • Students will be able to identify harmonic modulations in piano compositions (closely related keys only).
  • Students will be able to accurately harmonize a modulating single-line melody.
  • Students will be able to accurately perform a basic  (intermediate level) composition for treble and bass clef.
  • Students will be able to successfully transpose piano composition to two new keys.
  • Students will be able to successfully perform a basic piano composition at sight.
  • Students will be able to successfully create and perform accompaniment from a lead sheet.

MUS 203 : Introduction to Music and Its Literature

Covers music of the post-Romantic era and the 20th century.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Communicate effectively with musicians and nonmusicians on the historic development of the western music tradition.
  • Persuasively convey how the western music tradition represents a diversity of forms of music expression, cultural norms, social-political hierarchy, and religious ogma.
  • Educate others about how remarkable individual usical accomplishments have impacted the cultural, religious, artistic, and musical traditions of their time, and still bear influence today.
  • Perform and create music employing the period and stylistic characteristics of the post-romantic and 20th century western music tradition.
  • Advocate before political, educational, and community member organizations about the intrinsic value and importance of music in education.

MUS 205 : Introduction to Jazz History

Covers the 90-year history of jazz, a truly American art form. Examines and analyzes eras, styles, and significant artists.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Understand that the study of jazz involves an analysis of what motivates humans to create and how their creations reflect their values and world views
  • Experience jazz music “dynamically,” that is, to appreciate simultaneously the uniqueness of a work, its origins and precedent, its potential as an inspiration and influence on later music and its relationship to a particular cultural moment
  • Critically examine the impact of jazz on social interaction so as to encourage sensitivity and empathy toward people with different values or beliefs.

MUS 206 : Introduction to the History of Rock Music

Introduces the history of rock music. Examines rock music's roots and development, its innovators and significant events through a cultural as well as musical perspective.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion, students will be able to:

  • Use an understanding of the technological advancements and development of the record industry during the 20th and 21st centuries (in relation to rock music) to interpret and understand current and possible future technological trends in music.
  • Use an understanding of the cultural and sociological dynamics that created rock music to better integrate ones own beliefs effectively into the community.
  • Cultivate a personal set of aesthetic and artistic values informed by an understanding of the development of genres, innovations, and trends in rock music.
  • Use the ability to examine and analyze a piece of music based on structural and expressive elements to interpret and understand other communicative media.
  • Employ knowledge of rock music’s development to analyze current social and cultural trends and their relation to past social and cultural movements.

MUS 207 : Introduction to the History of Folk Music

Provides the historic development and the musical and textural characteristics of American folk music, from its Anglo-Celtic, Hispanic, African and Native American roots to the present, including country music, bluegrass, blues, border music, religious and other ethnic music. Discusses Folk revivals and the significance of songs in terms of the social norms of the time, including the interaction of folk music with popular music.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Appreciate the musical traditions of the diverse cultures of the United States, and enjoy a life enriched by the exposure to and the understanding of personal and cultural achievements through expression.
  • Experience music "dynamically," that is, to appreciate simultaneously the uniqueness and value of each culture and its music through particular cultural
  • moments, origins, precedents and potential in relationship to and inspiration upon other music.
  • Appreciate the artistic, social, historical, and cultural contexts of folk music through observation and critique in order to be an informed listener.

MUS 220A : Chorus

Provides an opportunity to sing in a large general chorus of mixed voices. Includes rehearsal and performance at an elementary level using repertory drawn from the canon of choral works from the 16th-21st centuries. No audition required.

Credits

1

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

  • Use an understanding of beginning musicianship and performance etiquette to perform choral repertoire to a public audience as a member of a large vocal ensemble.
  • Use an understanding of beginning music literacy to prepare and rehearse choral repertoire as a member of a large vocal ensemble.
  • Use an understanding of beginning rehearsal techniques and etiquette to follow a conductor, annotate music, and be a contributing member of a large vocal ensemble during rehearsal.
  • Use an understanding of stylistic differences in choral repertoire to accurately interpret vocal music in performance.
  • Use a beginning understanding of vocal range and type to continue to improve as a singer.

MUS 220B : Chorus

Provides the opportunity to sing in a large general chorus of mixed voices. Includes rehearsal and performance of repertory drawn from the canon of choral works from the 16th-21st centuries. No audition is required.

Credits

1

Prerequisites

Upon successful completion, students should be able to:

  • Use an understanding of advanced beginning musicianship and performance etiquette to perform basic repertory to a public audience as a member of a large vocal ensemble.
  • Use an understanding of advanced beginning music literacy to prepare and rehearse basic repertory as a member of a large vocal ensemble.
  • Use an understanding of advanced beginning rehearsal techniques and etiquette to follow a conductor, annotate music, and be a contributing member of a large vocal ensemble during rehearsal.
  • Use an understanding of stylistic differences in advanced beginning repertory to accurately interpret vocal music in performance.
  • Use an understanding of vocal range and type to continue to improve as a singer.

MUS 220C : Chorus

Provides the opportunity to sing in a large general chorus of mixed voices. Includes rehearsal and performance of repertory drawn from the canon of choral works from the 16th-21st centuries. No audition is required.

Credits

1

Prerequisites

Upon successful completion, students should be able to:

  • Use an understanding of beginning-intermediate musicianship and performance etiquette to perform basic repertory to a public audience as a member of a large vocal ensemble.
  • Use an understanding of beginning-intermediate music literacy to prepare and rehearse basic repertory as a member of a large vocal ensemble.
  • Use an understanding of beginning-intermediate rehearsal techniques and etiquette to follow a conductor, annotate music, and be a contributing member of a large vocal ensemble during rehearsal.
  • Use an understanding of stylistic differences in beginning-intermediate repertory to accurately interpret vocal music in performance.

MUS 220D : Chorus

Provides the opportunity to sing in a large general chorus of mixed voices. Includes rehearsal and performance of repertory drawn from the canon of choral works from the 16th-21st centuries. No audition is required.

Credits

1

Prerequisites

Upon successful completion, students should be able to:

  • Use an understanding of intermediate musicianship and performance etiquette to perform basic repertory to a public audience as a member of a large vocal ensemble.
  • Use an understanding of intermediate music literacy to prepare and rehearse basic repertory as a member of a large vocal ensemble.
  • Use an understanding of intermediate rehearsal techniques and etiquette to follow a conductor, annotate music, and be a contributing member of a large vocal ensemble during rehearsal.
  • Use an understanding of stylistic differences in intermediate repertory to accurately interpret vocal music in performance.

MUS 220E : Chorus

Provides the opportunity to sing in a large general chorus of mixed voices. Includes rehearsal and performance of repertory drawn from the canon of choral works from the 16th-21st centuries. No audition is required.

Credits

1

Prerequisites

Upon successful completion, students should be able to:

  • Use an understanding of intermediate-advanced musicianship and performance etiquette to perform basic repertory to a public audience as a member of a large vocal ensemble.
  • Use an understanding of intermediate-advanced music literacy to prepare and rehearse basic repertory as a member of a large vocal ensemble.
  • Use an understanding of intermediate-advanced rehearsal techniques and etiquette to follow a conductor, annotate music, and be a contributing member of a large vocal ensemble during rehearsal.
  • Use an understanding of stylistic differences in intermediate-advanced repertory to accurately interpret vocal music in performance.

MUS 220F : Chorus

Provides the opportunity to sing in a large general chorus of mixed voices. Includes rehearsal and performance of repertory drawn from the canon of choral works from the 16th-21st centuries. No audition is required.

Credits

1

Prerequisites

Upon successful completion, students should be able to:

  • Use an understanding of advanced musicianship and performance etiquette to perform basic repertory to a public audience as a member of a large vocal ensemble.
  • Use an understanding of advanced music literacy to prepare and rehearse basic repertory as a member of a large vocal ensemble.
  • Use an understanding of advanced rehearsal techniques and etiquette to follow a conductor, annotate music, and be a contributing member of a large vocal ensemble during rehearsal.
  • Use an understanding of stylistic differences in advanced repertory to accurately interpret vocal music in performance.