Education

Teacher Education Pathway Courses

Due to the highly individualized nature of the course work required for teacher licensure based on certification level and subject matter, students are asked to work with Theresa Harper, Teacher Education Pathway Advisor, to create an academic plan.  Please contact her via email at theresa.harper@oregoncoastcc.org.

Degrees and Certificates

Classes

ED 100 : Introduction to Education Careers

Introduction to the field of education including Early Childhood and K-12 careers.  Explores a wide range of occupations and identifies the educational and skill requirements for each. Covers ways of gathering information about specific occupations. Includes perspectives on a variety of careers to further illustrate the roles of education professionals.

Credits

1

Prerequisites

None

Upon completion of the course students will be able to:

  • Describe positions and careers in the field of education including classified (paraprofessional), certified (licensed teachers), administrators, and specialists including their typical responsibilities.
  • Identify and research occupational information such as outlook, growth, wages, and training/licensure requirements for education careers in Early Childhood and K-12 settings, both public and private.
  • Utilize information of a selected education career to develop occupational and educational goals.
     

ED 102 : Digital and Visual Communication Fundamentals

Covers visual communication concepts and techniques and their application to educational and library settings. Covers design principles and strategies to create content and graphics used in 2-D and 3-D visual formats. Includes the development and creation of posters, bulletin boards, presentations, handouts, brochures, educational games, and displays.

Analyze and evaluate the effective and powerful use of design elements and layout and its impact and influence on the audience in thought and action. Electronic tools and resources are used to develop visual information, materials, and presentations. Introduction to various production techniques are incorporated into hands-on project development. Provides opportunities to empower educators and library staff to present information utilizing different modalities. 

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

  • Explain visual communication techniques and apply those techniques to create effective displays for library and educational settings.
  • Comply with copyright, accessibility, cultural, and ethical issues surrounding the use of images and content in display and presentations in print and non-print formats.
  • Properly use materials and resources as well as equipment, hardware, and software in the production of visuals/displays.
  • Analyze and communicate, verbally and in written form, the contextual, cultural, ethical, aesthetic, intellectual, and technical components involved in the production and use of visual materials.
  • Implement different modes of presentation based on analyzing the scope and scale of design tasks (computer, bulletin board, display case, window displays, hanging displays, posters, flyers, brochures, tri-fold displays, table-top displays, murals).
  • Problem-solve design challenges based on stated functional criteria.

ED 112 : Introduction to Children's Literature

Introduces children's literature, authors and illustrators. Covers current and classic works, book awards, artistic and literary elements, introduction to genres, basic book discussion techniques, and audio-visual and electronic formats.

This course provides opportunities for students to explore and share children's books including picture books, folktales, concept books, poetry, chapter books and novels. Emphasis will be placed on books, authors, and illustrators that have won major awards such as the Newbery Medal, the Caldecott Award, Coretta Scott King and Young Reader's Choice Awards. Students will gain experience and knowledge in book discussion/sharing techniques.

Emphasis is placed on being able to choose books for different age and grade levels to promote and integrate literature into the curriculum.  Students will gain experience and knowledge in evaluating books based on various curricular criteria including analyzing  literary, artistic, and cultural elements. Students will learn to analyze text using a culturally responsive lens exploring bias, stereotype, and cultural messaging, and consider ways to frame and select content for K-12 students. Students will analyze status quo cultural representations in children's literature and consider non-dominant themes in order to meet the needs of an increasingly diverse K-12 audience. Students will engage in book discussions/sharing techniques along with developing activity/lesson ideas.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

  • Describe the various types of major awards (such as the Newbery, Caldecott, Coretta Scott King and Young Reader's Choice Awards).
  • List and describe the use of basic artistic elements in picture book design.
  • List the literary elements of fiction.
  • Identify and analyze cultural elements using a culturally responsive lens exploring bias, stereotype, and cultural messaging, and consider ways to frame and select content for K-12 students.
  • Analyze and Evaluate nonfiction books based on content, structure, style, authenticity, and accuracy,
  • Read and report on assigned reading of children's literature.
  • Develop activity/lesson ideas based around children's literature and promoting curricular connections and integration.
  • Define and recognize the following genres: picture book, folktales, poetry, fantasy, realistic and historical fiction, biographies, nonfiction, multicultural, and graphic novels.

ED 120 : Introduction to Early Education and Family Studies

Introduces the foundations of early childhood education and family studies. Covers the history, scope, current issues and trends, focusing on programs and services for children, birth-5. Includes an emphasis on development, developmentally appropriate practices and observation of young children and professionals. Requires 2-hours per week of observation/participation. Students must enroll in the Oregon Office of Child Care Central Background Registry (Criminal Background Check). Students must show evidence of current TB test and MMR vaccination.

Addendum to Course Description

This course is intended to provide students with an overview of the field of Early Childhood Education with particular attention to development, developmentally appropriate practices and concepts relating to children ages 0-5. The course emphasizes the impact of development on the ways in which children interact with their environments, other children, and adults, and examines personal suitability for the field by activity participating/observing in an early education environment.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Students must enroll in the Oregon Office of Child Care Central Background Registry (Criminal Background Check). Students must show evidence of current TB test and MMR vaccination.

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

  • Identify the multiple influences on early development and learning in order to support young children and families.
  • Understand how positive relationships and supportive interactions build the foundation of effective learning environments for young children.

ED 124 : Multicultural Practices: for Early Childhood Education

Develops awareness of how personal experiences, belief systems, and values impact work with children and families. Examines the impact of cultural, linguistic, and class identities and histories on inter-relationships in diverse populations. Applies techniques for incorporating other peoples histories, values and belief systems into child-and-family-centered practices.

Addendum to Course Description

This is the first of a two course series.  This class is intended to encourage students to reflect on their experiences, belief systems, and values and the impact those experiences, values, and beliefs have on practice with children and families.  The second class in this series (Multicultural Practices:  Curriculum and Implementation) will introduce students to the creation, implementation, and evaluation of inclusionary and anti-bias curricula and environments.

Credits

3
  1. Identify the influences on self-identity, including culture, race, language, gender, sexual orientation, physical ability, and class.
  2. Recognize others identities as the product of cultural, linguistic and class influences.
  3. Assess cultural-, linguistic-, and class-related experiences and needs in learning communities for young children (infancy-school age) and their families.

ED 131 : Applied Learning Theory

Prepares teachers and instructional assistants to work in a standards-based setting. Offers strategies to plan and implement instruction, assess student progress and instructional effectiveness, and re-teach as needed. Focuses on learning and motivational theories that apply to instructional situations. Includes creating and studying activities for specific learning problems.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Students will:

  • Appy current research in learning, instruction, and motivation to tutoring and teaching experiences.
  • Modify and develop teaching techniques to meet both individual student needs as well as K-12 curriculum standards.
  • Assessinstructional effectiveness through looking at student work.

ED 136 : Learning with Technology

Explores existing and emerging educational technology being used in libraries and classrooms. Focuses on using educational technology to complement and enhance learning activities. Discusses basic principles of instructional design and adaptive technologies.

The curriculum for this course is based on the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) recommended foundations in technology for all teachers. It meets the National Educational Technology Standards for Teachers (NETS-T) and the national Technology Standards for School Administrators (TSSA) as recommended by ISTE. Course competencies are aligned with outcome 5 of the Oregon Paraeducator Certificate:- Apply Technology to support teaching, "learning and communication."

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Or equivalent placement.

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

  1. Use instructional theories and models to describe how technology integration into learning activities can enhance learning.
  2. Apply basic principles of instructional design to develop technology-enhanced learning activities for diverse learner groups.
  3. Create online instructional materials and presentations for use in educational settings.
  4. Evaluate educational technology for educational use.
  5. Collaborate and communicate with others using educational technology.
  6. Utilize assistive and adaptive technologies in the design and development of learning activities for diverse learner groups.

ED 224 : Foundations of Education

Provides an overview of the history and current issues in the field for K-12 education including the impact of philosophy on practice.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Students will be able to:

  • Use global and historical perspectives, philosophical concepts, and educational views to articulate evolving teaching philosophies of their own;
  • Use knowledge of the organization and management of the k-12 education system at a local, state, and national level to appropriately access resources;
  • Relate specific educational practices in teaching and organization/management to philosophical theories and practical considerations in order to engage in professional collaborations;
  • Connect issues of current and historical relevance to the field of education (e.g., diversity, accountability, standards, assessment, local vs. state vs. national control, funding) to professional daily practice.
  • Meet the following required statewide outcomes for Foundations of Education to successfully apply them to professional practice:
    • Describe the qualities and characteristics that are necessary for one to be a professional and effective educator.
    • Identify the roles, responsibilities and ethical expectations of teachers in today's schools.
    • Understand the multiple purposes of schooling in America.
    • Develop an initial personal philosophy of education through examination of different schools of thought.
    • Explain how major social, cultural, economic, and political forces have impacted and continue to impact education.
    • Describe the diversity found in today's students, e.g. culture, race, ability, gender, language, community and economic class.
    • Understand the relationship of diversity to educational access and societal equity.

ED 232 : Health, Safety and Nutrition Practices for Early Childhood Environment

Prepares the early childhood educator to meet the physical needs of young children of all abilities through preparation of a safe environment, planned routines and positive experiences in the area of health, safety and nutrition. Focuses on the physical needs of children, child abuse and neglect.

Credits

3

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of age-appropriate health and safety practices
  2. Discuss the principles and practices of nutrition in early childhood including family-style eating practices.
  3. Describe state licensing requirements for early care and education settings.
  4. Demonstrate understanding of an educator's responsibilities in reporting and supporting children's physical needs in cases of child abuse and neglect.

ED 251 : Overview of Exceptional Learners

Introduction to diverse conditions of students with special needs in public schools. Identifies and defines the following disabilities: learning disabilities, emotional and behavior disorders, mental retardation, severe and multiple disabilities, autism, health impairments, physical disabilities, communication disorders, vision impairments, hearing loss, and traumatic brain injury.

Credits

3

Students will:

  • Demonstrate the ability to understand terminology used in Special Education.
  • Investigate the different types of exceptional learners.
  • Investigate characteristics of their physical, mental, and emotional development.
  • Demonstrate respect for differences.
  • Demonstrate the ability to use reason, decision making, and complex problem solving skills.

ED 269 : Introduction to Teaching Students with Learning Disabilities

Defines terms associated with learning disabilities. Includes diagnostic procedures, remedial programs and teaching techniques. Prepares the professional educator to approach the study of exceptionalities and individuals with exceptionalities in a systematic and reflective manner. Integrates historical foundations, learning theories, philosophies, legal requirements, and practices geared toward the education of individuals with diverse needs and abilities in a variety of multicultural settings. Prepares individuals to effectively meet the educational, physical, social, and behavioral needs of students with learning disabilities.

Credits

3

Upon completion of the course students will be able to:

  • Describe key changes in special education.
  • Describe the key categories of learning disabilities and other related disabilities in young children, school age children, adolescents, and adults.
  • Identify the assessment tools utilized for assessment and guiding instruction in special education.
  • Explain the role of learning theory in the field of learning disabilities and related disabilities.
  • Describe the importance of developmental, behavioral, and cognitive psychology in developing instructional strategies for students with learning disabilities.
  • Identify the legal protections specific to students with disabilities.

ED 290 : Education Practicum

Students will complete a minimum of 60 hours as a volunteer or employee in an educational setting. Participate in discussions with peers to debrief experiences and make connections to education theory and practice. Recommended that students have completed or are currently enrolled in educational foundational courses before taking ED 290.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

These courses are also accepted as co-requisites.

Upon completion of the course students will be able to:

  • Apply professional, ethical, and legal knowledge in a classroom setting.
  • Demonstrate interpersonal and communication skills in ways that respect communication styles and differences and show sensitivity in regard to individuals' cultural, social, cognitive, and emotional differences.
  • Demonstrate professional workplace skills.
  • Develop educational competencies in designing and delivering instruction with the guidance of a licensed teacher.

ED 298A : Independent Projects in Education

Provides an opportunity to work independently on an individualized area of study within education under the sponsorship and guidance of an education faculty member.

Credits

1

Prerequisites

Instructor permission required.

Upon completion of the course students will be able to:

  • Meet the outcomes mutually agreed upon by the student and instructor for the independent project.
  • Engage in a minimum of 30 hours in identifying research-based practices in an educational setting.